Archive of ‘Canning And Preserving’ category

How To Can Chili

Last summer I canned a variety of foods to stock our pantry with, in order to have plenty for Fall and Winter.  I canned vegetables from our garden, fruit picked at local farms, as well as homemade soups and stews.  One project I tackled was learning how to can my recipe for homemade chili for long term storage.  How To Can Chili / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
I’m glad I did, because we were able to have jars of Mom’s Old-Fashioned Chili in our pantry to eat whenever we wanted throughout the long Winter!  Homemade chili must be canned using a pressure canner, so I took my recipe and slightly adapted it to make sure it conformed to canning safety guidelines and the results were wonderful!  Currently I only have ONE jar left from all the chili I canned last summer, so I feel the need to “can” some more coming on!

This recipe as written makes about 8 quarts of chili. The process is fairly simple.  At the same time I was cooking the chili, I was preparing the pressure canner, with 3″ of simmering water according to the pressure canner’s manufacturer instructions… and prepping my jars and lids according to safe USDA canning guidelines.

Ground beef, diced onions and a large diced green pepper were cooked in a large pan until done. Grease was drained from pan and discarded.  Meat mixture was then transferred to a very large stockpot.

How To Can Chili / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

To the meat mixture, I added canned diced tomatoes, kidney beans, chili beans, pinto beans, and black beans.  I also added water and the spices (oregano, cumin, salt, chili powder, cayenne powder, paprika, salt, and Worchestershire sauce). I cooked the chili on medium-high until it was boiling. At this point, give it a taste, and adjust salt, if necessary, to suit your preference.

How To Can Chili / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Prepared (clean and hot) canning jars were filled with the hot chili, leaving a 1″ headspace in each jar.  Air bubbles were removed, and the jar rims were wiped completely clean with a wet dishcloth to ensure a good seal.  I centered flat lids on top and screwed down the rings until they were fingertip tight.  Quart jars were processed at 10# pressure for 90 minutes. If using pint sized jars, process at 10# pressure for 75 minutes.

How To Can Chili / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Once cooking time was completed, I followed manufacturer instructions for letting the pressure drop to zero naturally, then followed instructions for safely removing the vent and lid. PLEASE follow your own pressure canners manufacturer instructions!  Once I removed the HOT jars of chili, I placed them onto a dish towel on the counter (don’t place them directly on countertop because temperature variations could lead to cracking the jars), and let them sit undisturbed overnight.  Once they had completely cooled, I checked to make sure each jar was properly sealed, wiped down the jars, put a label on each one, and into our pantry they went!

How To Can Chili / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

I’ve canned chili several times since then, and have had great results. It has been wonderful to have my homemade chili waiting to be opened and used in our pantry, for a good hot bowl of soup or a chili cheese dog with the hubby!  Hope you will consider trying this recipe. PLEASE be sure to follow all recommended safe canning methods to ensure your success!

How To Can Chili / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Recipe adapted from: http://www.thegratefulgirlcooks.com/moms-old-fashioned-chili/

How To Can Chili
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
How to pressure can jars of old-fashioned chili with ground beef and beans for long time storage
As Prepared By:
Recipe type: Entree
Serves: 8 quarts
Ingredients
  • 3 lbs. ground beef
  • 2 medium onions, diced
  • 1 large green bell pepper, diced
  • 3 (28 ounce) cans diced tomatoes (including juice)
  • 2 (15.5 ounce) cans kidney beans, drained
  • 2 (15.5 ounce) cans chili beans (including liquid)
  • 2 (15.5 ounce) cans black beans, drained
  • 1 (15.5 ounce) can pinto beans
  • Water (use 3½ large 28 ounce cans of water - use empty diced tomato cans)
  • 3 teaspoons dried oregano
  • 2 Tablespoons cumin
  • 4-5 teaspoons salt
  • 3 teaspoons paprika
  • 1½ Tablespoons garlic powder
  • 1½ teaspoons cayenne pepper
  • 8 Tablespoons chili powder
  • 5 Tablespoons Worcestershire sauce
  • Additional salt to taste (if necessary)
Directions
  1. While cooking chili, prepare your pressure canner, with 3" of simmering water. Prep jars and lids according to safe USDA canning guidelines.
  2. Brown ground beef, diced onions and diced green pepper in a large pan until fully cooked. Drain grease and discard. Transfer meat mixture to a very large stockpot.
  3. Add canned diced tomatoes, kidney beans, chili beans, pinto beans, and black beans to meat mixture. Stir. Add water,spices and Worcestershire sauce. Stir all ingredients well to combine. Cook chili on medium-high until it begins boiling. Give it a taste, and adjust salt, if necessary.
  4. Fill prepared (clean & hot) canning jars with hot chili, leaving a 1" headspace in each jar. Remove air bubbles with utensil, and adjust headspace, if necessary. Wipe jar rims clean with a wet dishcloth, to ensure a good seal. Center flat lids on top and screw down rings until fingertip tight. Process quart jars at 10# pressure for 90 minutes. If using pint jars, process at 10# pressure for 75 minutes.
  5. Once processing time is completed, let pressure drop to zero naturally, then follow instructions for safely removing vent and lid. PLEASE follow your pressure canners manufacturer instructions!
  6. Remove HOT jars of chili, place onto a dish towel on counter (don't place jars directly on counter as temperature variations could lead to cracking the jars). Let jars sit and cool undisturbed overnight. Once completely cooled, check to ensure each jar is properly sealed, wipe down jars, label each one, and store in pantry!
Notes
The chili thickens a little as it is processed. Once you open a jar, you may want to add just a little bit of water to the chili before heating, to thin it out.

 

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How To Can Dried Beans

In an effort to stock up my canned foods pantry a couple yeas ago, I decided to learn how to can dried beans.  The process is fairly simple using a pressure canner, and now my pantry stays well stocked with canned black beans, garbanzo beans, pinto beans, and others!How To Can Dried Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
As I said, you will need to have a Pressure Canner to be able to can beans safely.  I went straight to one of my Ball Blue Books-Guide To Preserving for my instructions (I love their books!).  Here’s how easy it is to can dried beans:

First thing you need to do is prepare the beans (the picture below is pinto beans).  Wash the dried beans under cool water then drain.   Place them in a large saucepan. Fill pan with water until beans are fully covered by 2 inches of water above beans.  Bring it to a boil; boil for 2 minutes. Remove pan from the heat; let the beans soak uncovered for an hour.

After they have soaked for an hour, drain. Place drained beans back into a large saucepan, and add enough water to cover by two inches again. Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a very low boil. Cover the saucepan and let beans cook for 30 minutes.

How To Can Dried Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

While the beans are cooking, prepare the pressure canner, canning jars, lids and screw bands according to manufacturer instructions.  When beans are done cooking, pack the beans into prepared, hot jars. Leave 1 inch headspace in each jar.  Add 1/2 teaspoon salt to each jar.  Ladle the hot cooking liquid or clean boiling water over the beans, being sure to still leave a 1 inch headspace.  Remove air bubbles from each jar, then take a wet paper towel and make sure rims are clean. Center the flat lids on jars, then tighten screw bands to fingertip tight.

How To Can Dried Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Put the filled jars onto rack and into pressure canner (which has 2-3 inches of simmering water).  Put the canner lid on and lock it into place, Turn heat to medium-high. Let the steam vent for 10 minutes, then put the weighted gauge over vent. Process beans at 10 pounds pressure. Pint jars are processed for 1 hour, 15 minutes. Quart jars are processed for 1 hour, 30 minutes.

How To Can Dried Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
When processing time is completed, turn off heat and let the canner cool until it reaches zero pressure.  Wait 5 additional minutes, then carefully remove lid. Let the jars cool for 5-10 minutes, then carefully remove jars from canner using canning tongs. Place onto a dish towel (try not to place the jars directly onto kitchen counter. Variances in temperature could possibly cause jars to crack).  Let jars cool for 12 hours, then check to make sure they are properly sealed, then label and store in your pantry!

How To Can Dried Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

I’ve canned many jars of beans since learning how. It is very convenient to not have to run to the grocery store when I need beans,  I use the garbanzo beans for my homemade hummus, and have used the black and pinto beans in my homemade chili.  Hope you try canning your own beans, and enjoy stocking your pantry!

How To Can Dried Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!Recipe Source:  “Ball Blue Book – Guide To Preserving”, copyright 2014, Hearthmark, LLC, page 111.

How To Can Dried Beans
 
Prep time
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Total time
 
It's easy and economical to make canned beans using dried beans and a pressure canner!
As Prepared By:
Recipe type: Canning
Serves: 6 pint jars or 3 quart jars
Ingredients
  • 6¾ pounds dried beans (kidney, garbanzo, black, pinto Great Northern or cranberry)
  • Water
  • Salt
Directions
  1. Wash dried beans under cool water, then drain. Place beans in a large saucepan. Fill pan with water until beans are fully covered by 2 inches of water (above beans). Bring to a boil; boil for 2 minutes. Remove pan from heat; let beans soak uncovered for an hour.
  2. After beans have soaked an hour, drain. Place drained beans back into large saucepan; add enough water to cover by two inches again. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a very low boil. Cover the saucepan and let beans cook for 30 minutes.
  3. While the beans are cooking, prepare pressure canner, canning jars, lids and screw bands according to manufacturer instructions. When beans are done cooking, pack beans into prepared hot jars. Leave 1 inch headspace in each jar. Add ½ teaspoon salt to each jar. Ladle hot cooking liquid or clean boiling water over beans, being sure to leave a 1 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles from jars, then take a wet paper towel and make sure rims are clean. Center the flat lids on jars, then tighten screw bands to fingertip tight.
  4. Put filled jars onto rack and into pressure canner (which has 2-3 inches of simmering water). Put canner lid on, lock it into place, Turn heat to medium-high. Let the steam vent for 10 minutes, then put the weighted gauge over vent. Process beans at 10 pounds pressure. Pint jars are processed for 1 hour, 15 minutes. Quart jars are processed for 1 hour, 30 minutes.
  5. When processing time is completed, turn off heat and let canner cool until it reaches zero pressure. Wait 5 additional minutes, then carefully remove lid. Let the jars cool in pan for 5-10 minutes, then carefully remove jars from canner using canning tongs. Place hot jars on a dish towel (don't put jars directly onto kitchen counter. Variances in temperature could cause jars to crack). Let jars cool for 12 hours, then check to make sure they are properly sealed, then label and store in your pantry!

 

 

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How To Can Strawberry Jam

One of the first things I ever learned how to can was Strawberry Jam. There’s just something about a jar of home-canned jam that makes it special. Do you know how to can strawberry jam? It’s not so hard. Really!  It can be made year-round, due to the availability of this delicious fruit.How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
I grow strawberries in my small backyard garden, and love to have them to snack on.  But when I am going to make jam, I usually end up going to a local U-Pick farm in the Spring and picking a large amount of them, as you can see from the photo below. Regardless of how you “get” the strawberries (growing them, grocery store or picking them at a farm), jars of homemade strawberry jam are wonderful to have in the pantry to enjoy, and have available to give as gifts throughout the year.

How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Strawberry Jam is canned for long term storage using a water bath canner.  While getting the jam made and ready for canning, you can begin heating the water in a canner, and prepping jars, lids and rings per manufacturer instructions, so everything is ready to go when the jam is ready.

Here’s how to make the jam and can it:  Start by placing clean and de-stemmed strawberries in a large bowl and crush them (I use my potato masher to crush the fruit). You can also use a food processor for this, but do not puree the fruit. Use the pulse button to chop fruit. You need small pieces of the strawberries in the jam!

Measure the exact amount of crushed fruit the recipe calls for into a large heavy saucepot.  Add fresh lemon juice and 1 box of powdered pectin into the fruit; stir to combine. I also add 1/2 teaspoon of butter to the fruit, which helps to keep the fruit from foaming too much while it cooks (but this is optional).

How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Measure exact amount of sugar into a separate bowl. Set aside until ready to add to the hot fruit mixture.

Bring the strawberry mixture to a FULL ROLLING BOIL over High heat.  Stir mixture CONSTANTLY.  (*A full rolling boil means that the strawberry mixture doesn’t stop boiling, even when you are stirring it). As soon as mixture comes to a full rolling boil, dump ALL the sugar in at once, and stir well, to combine.

Bring the jam mixture back to a FULL ROLLING BOIL, then let it boil for 4 minutes. Be sure to stir jam constantly so it won’t burn on the bottom of pan.  Remove pan from heat. Skim off any foam that appears on top of jam and discard.

How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Ladle the hot jam quickly into clean, pre-heated jars.  Fill each jar almost to top, leaving 1/8 inch headspace. Insert a non-metallic utensil into each jar two or three times to remove air bubbles, then adjust headspace, if necessary.

How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Wipe the rims of each jar with a wet paper towel or clean dishcloth to remove any jam residue (residue would prevent jars from sealing properly).  Cover each jar with prepared flat lid, add screwband and tighten. Place the hot jars (using canning tongs) onto canning rack.

strawberry5How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Lower rack into simmering water in canner (the reason the jars must be on a slightly elevated rack is so the jars don’t crack while in contact with direct heat on bottom of pan).  Make sure the hot water completely covers the jar tops by a couple inches (add additional hot water if needed). Cover the canner.  Bring the water inside to a gentle boil. Once boiling, process the jam for 10 minutes.

How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

When processing time is complete, remove jars and place them upright on a dish towel until they have cooled completely (do not place hot jars directly onto kitchen counter. Temperature variances could cause the jars to crack).

How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Once jars have completely cooled (12 hours or overnight), make sure to test the seal on the jars before storing in pantry. (Press the middle part of the lid. If it springs back, the seal is bad, and the jam will need to be stored in the refrigerator). If the jars have a good seal,  label them and store in pantry, as they are shelf stable.
How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

When ready to use, open up a jar, and spread some of that thick, sweet strawberry-goodness on a piece of toast… and ENJOY the delicious work of your hands! YUM!

How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Have a wonderful day!  Spring is just around the corner… can’t wait to get out there, pick some fresh delicious strawberries and make more jam! I’ve given away so many jars of homemade jam to friends and family recently, I need to make more just so WE can have some around to enjoy this year!  Go figure!

How To Can Strawberry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Recipe Source:  Written instructions with box of MCP Premium 100% Natural Fruit Pectin

How To Can Strawberry Jam
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
As Prepared By:
Recipe type: Jam
Serves: 11 cups
Ingredients
  • 5¾ cups crushed strawberries (approx. 6 pints of strawberries)
  • ¼ cup fresh lemon juice
  • 1 box MCP powdered pectin
  • ½ teaspoon butter (to help cut down on foaming-optional)
  • 8½ cups granulated sugar
Directions
  1. While getting jam ready for canning, begin heating water in canner, and prep jars, lids and rings per manufacturer instructions , so they're ready to go once jam is ready.
  2. Place strawberries in large bowl and crush them (I use my potato masher to crush the fruit). You can use a food processor for this, but do not puree fruit. Use pulse button to chop fruit. You need small pieces of strawberries in the jam!
  3. Measure exact amount of fruit the recipe calls for into large saucepot. Add fresh lemon juice and 1 box powdered pectin; stir to combine. (I add ½ teaspoon of butter also, which helps keep foam amount down during cooking.
  4. Measure exact amount of sugar into separate bowl. Set aside.
  5. Bring strawberry mixture to a FULL ROLLING BOIL on High heat. Stir mixture constantly (*A full rolling boil means the fruit doesn't stop boiling, even while stirring). As soon as mixture comes to a full rolling boil, dump ALL the sugar in at once, and stir well, to combine.
  6. Bring jam back to a FULL ROLLING BOIL, then let it boil for 4 minutes. Be sure to stir jam constantly. When done, remove pan from heat. Skim off any foam on top of jam and discard.
  7. Ladle hot jam quickly into clean, pre-heated jars. Fill each jar, leaving ⅛ inch of headspace. Remove air bubbles from jar by inserting a non-metallic utensil into jar 2 or 3 times. Wipe rims of jars with wet paper towel or dishcloth to remove any jam residue (residue prevents jars from sealing properly). Cover jars with prepared flat lid, add screwband and tighten. Place jars carefully (using canning tongs) onto canning rack. Lower rack into hot simmering water in canner. Make sure hot water completely covers jar tops by a couple inches (add additional hot water if needed). Cover the canner.
  8. Bring water in canner to a gentle boil. Once boiling, process jam for 10 minutes.
  9. When processing time is complete, remove jars and place them upright on a dish towel on counter until they've cooled completely (do not place hot jars directly onto kitchen counter. Temperature variances could cause jars to crack).
  10. Once jars have completely cooled (12 hours or overnight), make sure to test seal on the jars before storing in pantry. (Press middle part of the lid with index finger. If it springs back, seal is bad, and jar will need to be stored in refrigerator). If jars have a good seal, label the jars and store in pantry.

 

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How To Can Ranch Style Beans

If you enjoy beans as a hearty side dish for chicken, burgers, hot dogs, etc. AND like canning, then you might be interested in learning how to can ranch style beans.How To Can Ranch Style Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks
I found the recipe on a fantastic website for canning (sbcanning.com), and wanted to try canning some ranch style beans to have in my pantry to use as a side dish for some of our dinners later in the year. I found the recipe to be be easy to prepare, and the beans were quite delicious (recipe as written makes 5 pints, but is easily doubled). The original recipe calls for 4 Tablespoons chili powder, but I used only 3 Tablespoons, to lower the “spicy factor”. That was the only change I made to the original recipe. Here’s how to make them:

Prepare jars, lids, pressure canner, according to manufacturer instructions.  Put the dried pinto beans in a large saucepan (or Dutch oven). Add water to the pan, making sure to cover beans fully by two inches. Bring to a full boil; continue boiling for 2 minutes.  Take pan off the heat, cover pan, and let beans sit (and soak) for 1 hour, then drain the beans. (SEE NOTES SECTION IN PRINTABLE RECIPE FOR ALTERNATE METHOD).

How To Can Ranch Style Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks

In large skillet, heat oil on medium. When oil is hot, add chopped onions; cook for 9-10 minutes. Add minced garlic and cook, stirring constantly for 1 minute (don’t let garlic burn).

How To Can Ranch Style Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks

Add tomatoes, brown sugar, apple cider vinegar, water and various spices (paprika, cumin, chili powder, and oregano). Transfer this mixture to a blender or food processor (may have to do this in batches). Process until mixture is smooth.

How To Can Ranch Style Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks

How To Can Ranch Style Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks

Bring 3-4 cups of water (or beef broth) to a boil in separate pan. Once boiling, remove from heat.

Add prepared pinto beans to hot, pureed tomato mixture. Stir to combine. (Make sure mixture is hot before adding to prepared jars.

How To Can Ranch Style Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks

Fill hot pint jars 3/4 of the way full.  Add salt and pepper to each jar.  Add boiling water (or beef broth) to each jar, being sure to leave 1″ headspace. Make sure to remove the air bubbles, then adjust headspace, if necessary. Wipe the rims clean with a damp paper towel, then put on flat lids and rings.

How To Can Ranch Style Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks

Process in pressure canner. If using a weighted gauge canner, process pints at 10 pounds pressure for 75 minutes.  If using a dial gauge canner, process at 11 pounds pressure.  Quart sized jars should be processed for 85 minutes.

How To Can Ranch Style Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks

Once beans are done, and have been removed from canner (following manufacturer instructions!), let the jars cool on a dish towel. Once they have completely cooled, label the jars; store in your pantry (to use at a later date) as a quick “grab and go” side dish!

How To Can Ranch Style Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks

I love canning during the cold Winter months when I’m inside a lot, due to cold weather, snow or rain. It feels wonderful to have my pantry stocked and ready for the rest of the year. Hope you will consider trying this recipe.

How To Can Ranch Style Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks

Recipe Source: http://www.sbcanning.com/2013/10/canning-ranch-style-beans.html

How To Can Ranch Style Beans
 
Prep time
Cook time
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Slightly spicy, yet full of flavor, these canned ranch style beans are a perfect "grab and go" side dish for chicken, hamburger, hot dogs, etc.
As Prepared By:
Recipe type: Canning
Serves: 5 pints
Ingredients
  • 1 pound dried pinto beans (16 ounces)
  • 3-4 Tablespoons chili powder (I used 3)
  • 6 cloves garlic, finely minced
  • 1 brown onion, diced
  • 1 can (15 ounces) diced tomatoes (can substitute 2 medium, peeled/diced tomatoes)
  • 1 teaspoon brown sugar
  • 1 teaspoon apple cider vinegar
  • 1 teaspoon paprika
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • ½ teaspoon oregano
  • 1 cup water
To Add To Jars:
  • ½ teaspoon salt and ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 3-4 cups boiling water (or beef broth)
Directions
  1. Prepare jars, lids, pressure canner, according to manufacturer instructions. Put dried pinto beans in a large saucepan (or Dutch oven). Add water to pan, making sure to cover beans fully by two inches. Bring to a full boil; continue boiling for 2 minutes. Take pan off heat, cover, and let beans sit (and soak) for 1 hour, then drain beans.
  2. In large skillet, heat oil on medium. When oil is hot, add chopped onions; cook for 9-10 minutes. Add minced garlic and cook, stirring constantly for 1 minute (don't let garlic burn).
  3. Add tomatoes, brown sugar, apple cider vinegar, water, paprika, cumin, chili powder, and oregano. Transfer mixture to a blender or food processor (may have to do this in batches). Process until mixture is smooth.
  4. Bring 3-4 cups of water (or beef broth) to a boil in separate pan. Once boiling, remove from heat.
  5. Add prepared pinto beans to hot, pureed tomato mixture. Stir to combine. (Make sure mixture is hot before adding to prepared jars.
  6. Fill hot pint jars ¾ of the way full. Add salt and pepper to each jar. Add boiling water (or beef broth) to each jar, being sure to leave 1" headspace. Remove air bubbles, then adjust headspace, if necessary. Wipe jar rims clean, then put on flat lids and rings, tightening to fingertip tight.
  7. Processing: If using weighted gauge canner, process pints at 10# pressure for 75 minutes. If using dial gauge canner, process at 11# pressure. Quart jars must be processed for 85 minutes.
  8. Once beans are done, and jars have been removed from canner (following manufacturer instructions), let jars cool on a dish towel. Once completely cooled, label jars; store in pantry.
Notes
Alternate Method For Beans: Sort and rinse beans. Soak in water overnight. Drain. Place beans in LARGE saucepan. Cover with cold water (water must be two inches above beans). Bring beans to a LOW BOIL and cook, stirring occasionally for 30 minutes. Drain. Proceed with remainder of recipe.

 

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Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade

If you enjoy the flavor combination of rhubarb and oranges, then you will enjoy this recipe for canning Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade!Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
This recipe is fairly simple in that it requires NO PECTIN, and only three ingredients to make some incredible tasting marmalade! If you prefer a “not as chunky” JAM that uses Pectin to make this same flavor combo, be sure and check out my recipe for Rhubarb-Orange Jam… that recipe uses a slightly different process for preparing the jam.

Before beginning, prepare your water bath canner, jars and lids, according to canning and manufacturer guidelines.  Place rhubarb and granulated sugar into a large soup pot or Dutch oven.

Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Place the two oranges (I cut them into chunks and removed any seeds), INCLUDING PEEL, into a food processor. Process the oranges until blended and in small pieces.

Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Add the processed oranges to the rhubarb-sugar mixture in pan. Bring the fruit mixture to a boil, stirring frequently. Once fruit begins boiling, turn down the heat and simmer mixture (uncovered) for about an hour, stirring frequently to prevent scorching.

Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Mash the rhubarb with a potato masher as it cooks to help break down the rhubarb.  Cook marmalade until mixture “sheets” from a very cold spoon (about an hour). **Notes on the “sheeting” process can be found in the NOTES section of the printable recipe.

rhubarb-orange-marmalade3Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Once marmalade is done cooking, and the gel stage has been reached, remove the pan from the stove. If any foam has appeared on the surface of jam, remove it with a spoon and discard.  Carefully ladle the hot marmalade into prepared hot canning jars, leaving 1/4 inch headspace. Be sure to remove any air bubbles, and adjust headspace, if necessary, by adding or removing jam to reach correct headspace.  Wipe the jar rims clean with a wet cloth or paper towel to remove spills and ensure a good seal. Place the prepared lids and screwband on jars; tighten to fingertip tight.

Place filled jars into simmering water onto canning rack in water bath canner. Make sure the jars are completely covered (by at least an inch above the top of jars) with hot water. Bring water to a boil; once water has reached a full boil, process jars for 10 minutes.

Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

When done, carefully remove HOT jars to a dish towel on countertop (do not place directly on counter as temperature variations could cause jars to crack). Let jars cool completely, undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Label and store.  This recipe makes approximately 8 half-pint or 4 pint jars. Processing time is the same for both sized jars.

rhubarb-orange-marmalade3Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

I love to make jams and marmalades to sample throughout the year OR to tuck into a gift basket for a friend when they least expect it!  This Rhubarb-Orange Marmade is delicious!

Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Recipe Source:  http://www.tasteofhome.com/recipes/rhubarb-marmalade/

Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
You will enjoy this delightful marmalade, made with oranges and rhubarb. Delicious on toast, biscuits, etc.
As Prepared By:
Recipe type: Jam / Canning and Preserving
Serves: 8 half-pints (approx)
Ingredients
  • 6 cups fresh rhubarb, chopped (See NOTES section for info on using frozen rhubarb)
  • 6 cups sugar
  • 2 medium oranges (including peel), cut into chunks
Directions
  1. Place the chopped rhubarb and sugar into a large Dutch oven or soup pot.
  2. Place the orange chunks (yes, peel included!) into a food processor. Process the oranges until small pieces are left. Add the orange pieces to the rhubarb/sugar mixture in the Dutch oven. Stir well, to combine.
  3. Bring mixture to a full boil, then reduce heat to a simmer. Cook, uncovered for about 1 hour, stirring quite often (to prevent burning on bottom of pot). When done the marmalade should "sheet" off of a spoon. (See NOTES section for explanation of process).
  4. While marmalade is cooking, prepare water bath canner, canning jars and lids, according to manufacturer and USDA canning instructions.
  5. Remove the marmalade and pan from the heat. Skim any foam off the top of the marmalade and discard. Ladle the hot marmalade into prepared and heated pint jars. Leave ¼ inch headspace in each jar. Remove any air bubbles, and adjust the headspace by adding or removing marmalade. Wipe the lids of each jar well with a damp towel to ensure a good seal. Place the heated flat lid onto each jar, then screw on the jar band until it is fingertip-tight.
  6. Carefully place hot jars into simmering water in the canner. Make sure jars are completely covered with hot water by at least an inch. Bring water in canner to a full boil; process jars for 10 minutes.
Notes
If using frozen rhubarb... measure frozen, then thaw. Drain in colander-don't press juice out
Processing time is for 1,000 feet of altitude and lower. Be sure to add a minute of processing time for each 1,000 feet higher in altitude you are.
"Sheeting process": Dip a very cold metal spoon into hot marmalade. Lift up spoon; hold it horizontally. The syrup will run off the edge of spoon. As it cooks, the syrup will usually run off in drops, two at a time. Keep cooking. Once jam has cooked enough that the drops mix together and "sheet" (blob together in solid sheet) off a very cold spoon, you've reached the gel stage.

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How To Can Green Beans

One summer several years ago I was “overrun” with green beans growing in my backyard raised bed garden. I KNEW I wanted to learn how to can green beans to preserve them, so I used a birthday gift card I received and bought a pressure canner. The rest is history!How To Can Green Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
That was several summers ago, and I’ve now learned and progressed in my pressure canning  (and water bath canning), to where I am now canning lots of veggies, beans, soups, jams, and stews… AND I LOVE IT! There’s something wonderful about pulling a jar of homegrown green beans (or other foods) right out of our pantry that makes me smile!  And the fact that I’ve never had a “bad” unsealed or cracked jar tells me I must be doing it right!

So here’s the “how to” of canning green beans.  Always refer to your pressure canner’s manufacturer’s instructions for your specific canner before beginning.  Start with fresh beans (for this batch I combined green and yellow beans from our garden). Wash beans, then drain them.  Trim the ends off the beans, then snap or cut them into 2 inch pieces. (I enjoy “snapping” beans while I watch the news).  I usually pack beans tightly into jars (to get an estimate of how many jars I will need), then remove beans,  re-wash jars, then proceed with canning process. Set beans aside until ready to pack into hot jars.

How To Can Green Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Wash the canning jars, then place them upside down on a dish towel-lined baking sheet.  Place them in a preheated 200 degree oven for about 20-25 minutes. Some people put them in simmering water to heat, but I like the convenience of having my stove top free while I am heating the water up in my pressure canner and heating boiling water to add to the filled jars.

How To Can Green Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

While the jars are in the oven heating, prepare pressure canner, jars and lids according to manufacturer instructions. Bring a kettle of water to a low boil. About 5 minutes before the jars are finished heating and the beans are ready to be added, pour some of the very hot water over the flat jar lids (and let them sit in the water in a bowl for 5 minutes – this softens the rubber seal).

I usually “raw pack” the beans (one of TWO canning methods), which means to tightly pack the raw green beans in the heated jars. Fill the jars to within one inch of the top of jar. Place 1/2 teaspoon canning salt into each jar. Pour boiling water (I use a canning funnel) into each jar, leaving 1 inch headspace. (See NOTES section of printable recipe for alternate method).

How To Can Green Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Remove air bubbles from jar; adjust the headspace by adding or removing liquid to ensure you have the correct 1 inch headspace. Use a paper towel and wipe the rim of each jar dry/clean. Place the heated flat lid on jar, then add screwband and tighten to fingertip tight.  Carefully place the jars into simmering water in the pressure canner, lock the canner lid in place, then turn it to medium high heat. As water inside comes to a boil, steam will escape through the vent. Let the steam vent for 10 minutes, then place vent cover on to close vent.

How To Can Green Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Continue heating until the pressure canner reaches 10 pounds pressure. Maintain this pressure throughout the cooking time indicated. (Pint jars = process for 20 minutes, Quart jars = process for 25 minutes).

How To Can Green Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

When processing time is completed, turn off the heat. Let the pressure drop down to zero naturally. Once the pressure returns to zero, wait a couple more minutes, then carefully remove vent cover only. Wait another minute, then carefully remove canner lid. Let the jars sit in the canner for 10 more minutes, then remove them, using canning tongs. Place the HOT jars onto a dish towel on the counter (DO NOT place directly on counter… temperature variations could make the jars crack!). Here’s a picture from another batch of jars using only GREEN beans.

How To Can Green Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Let the jars cool completely (for 12-24 hours) without disturbing, then check to make sure they sealed properly, label and store. Smile… and enjoy the reward from your small amount of work… a pantry full of green beans! I LOVE that I can preserve beans from our garden each year and pull a jar of home-grown green beans off a pantry shelf any time I want… (haven’t bought beans in years!).

Remember – vegetables and meats, soups, etc. must be pressure-canned, due to low acidity present in those foods… unfortunately they CANNOT be processed in a water bath canner (not enough heat to kill off any potentially harmful bacteria!).

How To Can Green Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

For me personally, it is very rewarding to see jars of homegrown vegetables (and soups, stews, jam, etc) line our pantry shelves… it feels awesome! I am so glad I learned to pressure can and have enjoyed the results produced ever since!  Have a blessed day!

How To Can Green Beans / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Recipe Source:  Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving, Published 2012, Robert Rose, Inc., Jarden Corporation, page 386 (and part of page 385)

How To Can Green Beans
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
It's fun preserving green beans by canning in a pressure canner.
As Prepared By:
Recipe type: Canning
Serves: Varies
Ingredients
  • Green beans (approx. 1½ - 2½ pounds of beans per QUART jar)
  • Canning salt
  • Canning jars and lids/screwbands
  • Boiling water
Directions
  1. Wash beans, then drain. Trim ends off beans, then snap or cut beans into 2 inch pieces.
  2. Wash canning jars, then place upside down on a dish towel-lined baking sheet. Place in a preheated 200 degree oven for 20-25 minutes. While jars are heating, prepare pressure canner, jars and lids according to manufacturer instructions. Bring a kettle of water to a low boil. About 5 minutes before the jars are finished heating and the beans are ready to be added, pour some of the very hot water over the flat jar lids (and let them sit in the water in a bowl for 5 minutes).
  3. Tightly pack the raw green beans in the heated jars. Fill the jars to within one inch of the top of jar. Place ½ teaspoon canning salt into each jar. Pour boiling water (use a canning funnel) into each jar, leaving 1 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles from jar; adjust headspace by adding or removing liquid to ensure you have a 1 inch headspace. Use a paper towel and wipe the rim of each jar dry/clean. Place the heated flat lid on jar, then add screwband and tighten to fingertip tight. Carefully place jars into simmering water in pressure canner, lock lid in place, then turn burner to medium high heat. As water inside comes to a boil, steam will escape through vent. Let the steam vent for 10 minutes, then place vent cover on to close vent.
  4. Continue heating until pressure canner reaches 10 pounds pressure. Maintain this pressure throughout the cooking time indicated. (Pint jars = process for 20 minutes, Quart jars = process for 25 minutes). Begin processing time once canner reaches 10 pounds pressure.
  5. When processing time is completed, turn off heat. Let the pressure drop to zero naturally. Once the pressure returns to zero, wait a couple more minutes, then carefully remove vent cover. Wait another minute, then carefully unlock and remove canner lid. Let the jars sit in canner for 10 minutes, then remove, using canning tongs. Place HOT jars onto a dish towel on counter (DO NOT place directly on counter... temperature variations could make jars crack!). Let jars cool completely (for 12-24 hours) without disturbing, check for proper seal, label and store.
Notes
Quantity will vary, based on how many beans you process.
Processing: 10# pressure. Pints=20 minutes, Quarts=25 minutes.

Alternate method: Hot Pack method: Cut beans combined with boiling water to cover. Bring liquid to boil (medium-high heat). Boil beans for 5 minutes. Drain (but reserve liquid for adding to jars, if desired). Put hot beans into jars; cover with boiling water or reserved liquid. Continue with rest of directions, as written.

 

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How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables

It’s the middle of Summer, yet I find myself mentally preparing for the Oregon Fall and Winter ahead. I decided to get a jump on the cold, rainy weather and get some canned goods ready. Here’s how to can beef stew with vegetables…jars of yummy stew… now in our pantry! How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
I only wanted to can a small batch of beef stew, so I cut the original recipe in my Ball Canning book in half, but added canned tomatoes, canned green beans, minced garlic, dried oregano and beef bouillon to the recipe, which added additional vegetables and flavor.  If you have the ability to process large quantities of jars, then by all means… double the recipe (below)! I have a smaller sized pressure canner, so the half recipe works well for my purposes!

If you love Beef Stew, but don’t enjoy canning, I would recommend checking out the Classic Beef Stew recipe on my blog, where the stew is BAKED slowly, and comes out thick, tender, and delicious! Check it out… it’s fabulous (and your home will smell so goooood!)!

The stew MUST be canned in a pressure canner, but the preparation for canning this stew was fairly easy!  Here’s what you do:  While you are preparing your canner, jars and lids (according to manufacturer and USDA guidelines), begin by browning beef cubes in one Tablespoon of hot oil. You may need to brown the beef in batches, depending on the quantity of stew you are preparing.

How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Place browned beef into a large stainless steel pot. Add potatoes, carrots, onions, diced canned tomatoes, celery, garlic, and spices.  Stir to combine.

How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Add 1 large beef bouillon cube to water (crumble it in with your fingers). Add one can green beans.  Add boiling water to completely cover meat and vegetables.  Stir to combine. Bring mixture to a boil, while stirring frequently.

How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Ladle the prepared stew into hot canning jars. Leave 1 inch headspace per jar. Remove air bubbles from jars. If needed, adjust the headspace in each jar, by adding or removing stew. Carefully wipe each rim with moistened paper towel to remove any moisture or grease, to ensure a good seal. Place hot flat lid onto each jar, add, then tighten down screwband to fingertip tight.

How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Place hot jars into water in pressure canner (prepared per manufacturer guidelines). Lock the lid, and turn up the heat to medium-high. Once it is boiling, let the steam vent from canner for 10 minutes, then close vent. Continue heating until you reach 10 pounds pressure. Pint jars are processed for 75 minutes, and Quart jars for 90 minutes.

Ham and Bean Soup / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

When processing time is completed, turn off heat.  Let the pressure in canner return to zero naturally. Once pressure returns to zero, wait a couple minutes, then carefully remove the vent cover. Wait a minute or so, then carefully remove the canner lid. Wait 10 more minutes, then remove hot jars to a dish towel on the counter. (Do not place boiling hot jars directly on counter- they might crack from temperature variance!).  Let jars cool completely, check for proper seal, label, then store in pantry.

How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

As you can see, I had a very busy day canning, but it felt good to get some Beef Stew, Split Pea and Ham Soup, and a few jars of Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade (from our garden rhubarb) made and into our pantry!  It will be great to have these ready to go on those rainy Oregon days I KNOW will be here sooner, rather than later!

How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Recipe Adapted From: The book called “Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving”, Published 2012, Robert Rose, Inc., page 407.

How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Hearty beef stew is the perfect comfort food! Here are instructions for canning this delicious stew.
As Prepared By:
Recipe type: Soup
Serves: 5 Quarts
Ingredients
  • 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
  • 2½ pounds stewing beef, cut into 1½ inch cubes
  • 6 cups potatoes, peeled and cubed
  • 4 cups carrots, peeled and sliced
  • 1½ cups chopped celery
  • 1½ cups chopped onions
  • 2 cans (11.5 ounce each) diced tomatoes
  • 1 can green beans (11.5 ounce)
  • 1 beef bouillon cube (large)
  • 2½ teaspoons salt
  • ½ teaspoon dried thyme
  • ½ teaspoon dried oregano
  • ½ teaspoon black pepper
  • 1½ teaspoon minced garlic
  • Boiling water (enough to cover)
  • 2½ teaspoons salt
Directions
  1. Prepare pressure canner, canning jars and lids, according to manufacturer instructions and general canning guidelines.
  2. Heat oil in large skillet (or very large saucepan) on medium-high. Brown the beef cubes (work in batches, if necessary). Only add additional oil if absolutely necessary.
  3. Place the browned beef into a very large saucepan; add potatoes, celery, carrots, onions, canned tomatoes, green beans, beef bouillon cube, and remaining spices. Stir to combine. Add boiling water to completely cover the ingredients. Bring the stew to a boil, while continuing to stir.
  4. Ladle the hot stew into hot canning jars. Be sure to leave a 1 inch headspace. Remove the air bubbles from each jar, then adjust the headspace by adding or removing stew, as necessary. Wipe the rims of each jar very well with a wet paper towel, to remove any trace of food or liquid. Place a heated flat lid on top, then screw the band down until it is fingertip tight.
  5. Carefully place the jars into prepared pressure canner. Lock the lid, then turn heat to medium high heat. Once it boils, vent the steam for 10 minutes, then close the vent. Continue to heat until canner reaches 10 pounds pressure. Process Quart jars for 90 minutes (If using pint jars, they need to be processed for 75 minutes).
  6. Once processing is completed, turn the heat off. Let the pressure return to zero naturally. Wait a few more minutes after if reaches zero, then open the vent cover. Remove the canner lid carefully (away from you). Let sit uncovered for 10 minutes, then carefully remove boiling hot jars to a dish towel. (Don't place boiling hot jars directly on counter as they might crack from temperature variance). Let jars cool completely, label and store in pantry.
Notes
Pint jars = 1 inch headspace. 75 minutes at 10# pressure = 10 jars
Quart jars = 1 inch headspace. 90 minutes at 10# pressure = 5 jars

 

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Split Pea and Ham Soup (and how to can it)

Last week I decided to can some Split Pea and Ham Soup to store away in our pantry for the cold Fall and Winter months ahead. I figured it’s good to be able to pull out a homemade “bone-warming” hearty soup off the pantry shelf when it’s cold and stormy outside!Split Pea and Ham Soup (and how to can it) / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
I decided to take some pics to show you how easy it is to can this soup. Guess what?  Even if you don’t can, this is a delicious, easy, and economical soup to prepare for your family (makes a big pot of soup). Here’s what you do:

Combine 2 cups of split peas (a one pound bag) with water (I used water PLUS added 2 large chicken bouillon cubes for flavor) in a large saucepan. Cook the peas on medium-low for about an hour, just until the peas become tender.

Split  Pea and Ham Soup / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Use an immersion blender to completely blend the peas until smooth. **You can also process the peas and liquid in a food processor (or blender) a little at a time, until puréed, (if no immersion blender is available). I puréed until smooth, but it’s okay to leave it a bit chunky, if desired.

Split Pea and Ham Soup / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Add sliced carrots, chopped ham, diced onion, one bay leaf and some allspice to the puréed pea mixture.

Split Pea and Ham Soup / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Bring the mixture to a boil (on medium-high heat), then cook on reduced heat for about 30 minutes. If the soup gets too thick, you can add a little bit more boiling water.

Split Pea and Ham Soup / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

While soup is cooking, prepare pressure canner, canning jars and flat lids per manufacturer instructions (for cleaning, heating, etc.). I usually put my clean canning jars on a dish towel lined baking sheet and let them heat in a 225 degree oven for about 20 minutes before filling.

Split Pea and Ham Soup / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Ladle hot soup into prepared hot jars (the soup will thicken a little as it cooks, by the way). Leave 1 inch headspace in each jar. Remove air bubbles from each jar, and make sure you have the correct headspace. Adjust, if necessary, by removing or adding liquid. Wipe rims of each jar clean with a wet paper towel to ensure a good seal. Place the prepared flat lid on jar, then tighten the screwband on, to fingertip tight.

Split Pea and Ham Soup / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Carefully place the prepared jars of soup into the prepared pressure canner. Lock the lid, and process, according to manufacturer and USDA instructions for YOUR pressure canner. (Example: Bring to boil, vent steam for 10 minutes, close vent, etc.).  Process jars of soup at 10 pounds pressure. Pint jars are processed for 75 minutes and Quart jars are processed for 90 minutes.

Split Pea and Ham Soup / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

When processing time is done, turn the heat off. Let the pressure in your canner drop to zero on it’s own. Wait a couple additional minutes, then open vent. Let canner sit for an additional 10 minutes once vent is open, then remove lid, followed by jars.

Place the hot jars onto a dish towel (do NOT set jars directly onto kitchen counter- they could crack). Let them cool undisturbed, for 24 hours, then label and store in pantry.

Split Pea and Ham Soup / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

This recipe (from one of my beloved Ball canning books), makes 5 pint jars or 2 Quart sized jars. I made 5 pint jars this time… and now they are happily shelved in our pantry for a “rainy” day!  The soup tends to thicken, so all you need to do is add a little bit of hot water to the opened jar of soup, and boom… instant soup!

Split Pea and Ham Soup / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

I find it quite fulfilling to prepare canned foods to stock up our pantry… hope you enjoy the canning process, as well as this wonderful tasting soup!  Have a great day!

Split Pea and Ham Soup (and how to can it) / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Recipe Source: My book called “Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving”, Published 2012, Robert Rose, Inc., page 403.

Split Pea and Ham Soup (and how to can it)
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Hearty split pea and ham soup... whether you make a big pot of soup to eat now OR want to can it, to store in pantry, this recipe will satisfy.
As Prepared By:
Recipe type: Soup
Serves: 5 pints
Ingredients
  • 2 cups dried split peas
  • 8 cups water
  • 2 large chicken bouillon cubes (optional, but adds additional flavor to broth)
  • 1 cup diced ham
  • 1 ½ cups sliced carrots
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Salt and Pepper, to taste
Directions
  1. Place split peas, water and chicken bouillon cubes into a large saucepan or soup pot (stainless steel is best). Bring the ingredients to a boil with medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Once they come to a boil, turn down the heat to a low simmer; let the peas continue to cook for about an hour (or until the split peas become tender).
  2. When peas are done, purée peas and liquid, using a stick immersion blender OR processing in batches using a food processor. If using food processor, return purée to pan.
  3. Prepare pressure canner, jars, lids, etc. per manufacturer guidelines.
  4. Add ham, carrots, onion, allspice and bay leaf to soup. Bring soup to a boil. Reduce heat to low and cook for 30 minutes. Season soup with salt and pepper, to taste. If soup is a bit too thick, you can thin it out a little by adding a bit of boiling water to pan. Stir to combine. Remove bay leaf.
  5. Place hot, prepared jars on a dish towel. Ladle the soup mixture into jars, being sure to leave 1 inch headspace on each jar. Remove or add liquid, as necessary, to ensure correct headspace. Remove air bubbles from jars, then wipe the rim of jars clean using a wet paper towel, to ensure a good seal. Place hot flat lids on jar, then screw the bands into place until they are fingertip tight.
  6. Carefully put the jars into water in prepared pressure canner. Lock lid; turn heat to medium-high. Once vent begins steaming, let it vent for 10 minutes, then close vent. Heat until canner reaches 10 pounds pressure. After it reaches 10 pounds pressure, process PINTS for 75 minutes and QUARTS for 90 minutes.
  7. When done, turn off heat. Let the pressure in the canner drop to zero naturally. Once it gets to zero, wait a couple more minutes, then open the vent cover. Wait another 10 minutes, then carefully remove the canner lid. Place the hot jars on a dish towel on counter, and let them sit undisturbed for 24 hours. Check for proper seal, then label and store jars in pantry.
Notes
If using quart sized jars, this recipe will make 2 quarts (plus a bit more). The recipe is easily doubled.
When you open a can, you will notice that the soup will have thickened slightly during the canning process. Just add a bit of water to soup, reheat and enjoy!

 

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Beef Jerky DIY!

Have you ever wondered HOW to make really great tasting beef jerky for a fraction of the price of store bought?  Well, if you or your family like to snack on beef jerky and you want to know how to make your own, either in a food dehydrator OR in your oven, read on!Beef Jerky DIY! / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Over 20 years ago I bought a food dehydrator (see photo below) for about $25. I have used that thing a LOT ever since. It is a real “workhorse”, and I have used it for making my own beef jerky (as well as many varieties of dried fruits, spices, veggies, etc.) ever since!  That original $25 I spent was a great investment. (The photo below is to show you my little 5 rack machine – drying mint leaves and cherry tomatoes from our garden).

Beef Jerky DIY / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Making beef jerky is very easy, actually. Very thin strips of beef are marinated overnight (or a minimum of 4 hours), then placed in the dehydrator or oven and “dried” until pliable.

Here’s how you make beef jerky (with only 4 ingredients!)  The basic mix is 3 parts soy sauce, 1 part brown sugar, and 1 part Liquid Smoke (the picture shows what kind I use – found at grocery store).  Mix it up in a medium bowl.

Beef Jerky DIY / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

The meat (I like to use London broil or flank steak) is sliced into very thin 1/8″ strips (it is easiest to cut if meat is partially thawed after being frozen).  If using London broil, cut slices WITH THE GRAIN. If using Flank steak, cut slices AGAINST THE GRAIN.Meat is then marinaded in sauce for a MINIMUM of 4 hours in refrigerator (overnight is BEST – covered container!).

Beef Jerky DIY / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

When meat is done marinating, lay strips on paper towels to absorb excess sauce. Pat lightly dry.

Beef Jerky DIY / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Place strips of beef onto dehydrator racks leaving space for air to flow between each piece. If using oven, place strips onto aluminum foil covered baking sheets.

Beef Jerky DIY / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

If using dehydrator, dry beef  strips for 3-4 hours, turning strips over about halfway through drying process. Jerky should be fully dry, but still pliable when done.  If using oven, dry the jerky on the lowest setting your oven will go (usually between 150 and 170 degrees). Jerky will need to dry in oven for 8-10 hours, so it’s easy to put it in oven at night and have it done the next morning.

The finished jerky will have a very nice smoky, slightly teriyaki taste, and boy, is it GOOD! Remove strips from dehydrator or oven, and let completely cool.  Keep jerky stored in an airtight container or sealable bag.  I’ve made my own beef jerky for over 20 years now, and it is always a big hit with my husband and our sons… and given the price of a bag of jerky at the store (whoa!), making it at home is a real money saver!

Beef Jerky DIY / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Hope you will consider trying this easy recipe… it’s never failed me yet!  Have a fantastic day!

Beef Jerky DIY! / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Recipe Source: My Mr. Coffee Food Dehydrator Owner’s Manual (really, really old)

Beef Jerky DIY!
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
As Prepared By:
Serves: 1 pound
Ingredients
For marinade:
  • 3 parts soy sauce
  • 1 part brown sugar
  • 1 part Liquid Smoke
For meat:
  • 1 pound London Broil or flank steak (or however much you want, quantity-wise). Try to use meat with a limited amount of fat present, for best results.
  • *The amount used will vary depending on how much meat you are using to make jerky. You will need to have enough of the sauce to marinade all strips of beef.
  • *FOR EXAMPLE: ¾ cup soy sauce, ¼ cup brown sugar, ¼ cup Liquid Smoke
Directions
  1. Slice meat into ⅛ inch wide strips (TIP: meat will cut BEST if you use slightly thawed, but still partially frozen meat).
  2. Combine marinade ingredients in medium sized bowl. Add meat strips to the marinade. Coat all meat with the marinade. Cover bowl and let marinate in refrigerator at LEAST 4 hours (or overnight-BEST!).
  3. When ready, lightly pat dry meat strips (place strips on paper towels).
  4. Lay strips on food dehydrator racks OR place strips on baking sheets lined with aluminum foil. Leave space between each piece so air can circulate.
  5. If using dehydrator, dehydrate at 145 degrees for approximately 3-4 hours, until dry but pliable.
  6. If using oven, turn oven to lowest setting (150-170 degrees). Let jerky bake for 8-10 hours until dry, but pliable.
  7. Remove beef jerky when done. Let cool completely. Store in airtight container. Enjoy!

 

 

Bing Cherry Jam

Each year I enjoy making many varieties of jam to store in our pantry, and to give away to family and friends. I’ve been canning jam for many years now.  Last summer I made Bing Cherry Jam for the first time, and was surprised at how delicious and flavorful it was!Bing Cherry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!
The recipe I used is from one of my Ball Blue Books (Guide To Preserving). The idea of making Bing cherry jam intrigued me, and it was fun being able to use my Homemade Amaretto in it, as one of the ingredients. The flavor of ripe cherries, paired with cinnamon, cloves, and almond liqueur make this quite a tasty jam!  This recipe makes about 6 half-pint jars, which means there’s enough jam to save, and extras to bless others with!

Bing Cherry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

If you enjoy making homemade jam, I heartily recommend this recipe. It truly has great flavor!

Bing Cherry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

Recipe Source:  “Ball Blue Book Guide To Preserving”, published 2014 by Hearthmark LLC dba Jarden Home Brands, page 49.

Bing Cherry Jam
 
Prep time
Cook time
Total time
 
Homemade Bing Cherry Jam is full of flavor and is perfect on toast or biscuits any time of day!
As Prepared By:
Recipe type: Jam
Serves: approximately 6 half-pint jars
Ingredients
  • 1 quart (about 2 pounds) Bing cherries, pitted and stemmed
  • 6 Tablespoons Ball Classic Pectin (powder)
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon cloves
  • ¼ cup lemon juice
  • ¼ cup almond liqueur (I used Amaretto)
  • 4 ½ cups granulated sugar
Directions
  1. While preparing the jam, also make sure you prepare water canner and hot canning jars/lids, per manufacturer instructions and USDA canning guidelines.
To Make Jam:
  1. Wash, drain, pit and de-stem cherries. Chop cherries into small pieces (make sure chopped cherries measure out to one quart, which is the equivalent of 4 cups).
  2. In a large saucepan, mix together the chopped cherries, pectin, cinnamon cloves, lemon juice and almond liqueur until well combined. Cook slowly on medium-high heat until mixture comes to a boil.
  3. Add the sugar all at once, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Bring this mixture to a FULL ROLLING BOIL (this means the boiling doesn't stop, even if you keep stirring it!). Let the jam boil fully for ONE MINUTE, continuing to stir the entire time. Remove the pan from the heat. If any foam has accumulated on top, skim it off with a spoon and discard.
To Fill Hot Canning Jars:
  1. Ladle hot jam into hot jars. Leave ¼ inch headspace in each jar. Remove any air bubbles from filled jar, by inserting plastic utensil into jar between jam and jar to release air that is trapped. Wipe the jar rim very good to ensure no sticky residue is present. Place lid and screw band onto jar. Tighten to fingertip tight only. Using canning tongs, carefully place each jar onto an elevated rack in simmering water (180 degrees) in water bath canner. Repeat the process until all your jars are filled and in canner.
To Process The Jam:
  1. Lower the filled rack into the simmering water. Make sure that the jars are completely covered with water (water must be an inch over the top of jar). Turn the heat to medium-high. Put a lid on the canner, and bring the water inside to a full, rolling boil. Once the water reaches a rolling boil, process the half-pint jars for 10 minutes. When 10 minutes is up, turn the heat off and take the lid off the pan. Let the jars sit in the hot water for 5 minutes, then carefully remove jars to a dish towel on the counter (Do not place hot jars directly on counter-they might crack, due to temperature variations). Let jars cool, upright, for 12 hours, without moving. Once cool, check to ensure a proper seal has been achieved, then label jars and store in pantry.
Notes
To check for a proper seal on jars after jars have completely cooled... gently press your fingertip into the center of the lid. If the lid doesn't move, the jar is vacuum sealed. At this point, you can remove the screw band for storage, and wipe down the jar before storing.

 

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