It’s easy and economical to use a pressure canner to can dried beans (pinto, garbanzo, black, etc.), for long term storage and convenience.It's easy and very economical to use a pressure canner to process and can dried beans (pinto, garbanzo, black, etc.), for long term storage and convenience.
In an effort to stock up my canned foods pantry a couple years ago, I decided to learn how to can dried beans.  The process is fairly simple using a pressure canner, and now my pantry stays well stocked with canned black beans, garbanzo beans, pinto beans, and others!

As I said, you will need to have a Pressure Canner to be able to can dried beans safely.  I went straight to one of my Ball Blue Books-Guide To Preserving for my instructions (I love their books!).  Here’s how easy it is to can dried beans:

How To Can Dried Beans

First thing you need to do is prepare the beans (the picture below is pinto beans).  Wash the dried beans under cool water then drain.   Place them in a large saucepan.

Fill pan with water until beans are fully covered by 2 inches of water above beans.  Bring it to a boil; boil for 2 minutes. Remove pan from the heat; let the beans soak uncovered for an hour.

Dried pinto beans ready to be used for canning!

Cook The Beans

After they have soaked for an hour, drain. Place drained beans back into a large saucepan, and add enough water to cover by two inches again.

Bring to a boil, then reduce the heat to a very low boil. Cover the saucepan and let beans cook for 30 minutes.

Dried beans must be soaked in water before cooking.

While the beans are cooking, prepare the pressure canner, canning jars, lids and screw bands according to manufacturer instructions.  When beans are done cooking, pack the beans into prepared, hot jars. Leave 1 inch headspace in each jar.  Add 1/2 teaspoon salt to each jar.

Fill The Prepared Canning Jars

Ladle the hot cooking liquid or clean boiling water over the beans, being sure to still leave a 1 inch headspace.  Remove air bubbles from each jar, then take a wet paper towel and make sure the rims are clean.

Center the flat lids on each of the jars, then tighten screw bands to fingertip tight.

Preparing canning jars to process dried beans.

Time To Can Dried Beans

Put the filled jars onto rack and into pressure canner (which has 2-3 inches of simmering water).  Put the canner lid on and lock it into place, Turn heat to medium-high. Let the steam vent for 10 minutes, then put the weighted gauge over vent.

Process beans at 10 pounds pressure. Pint jars are processed for 1 hour, 15 minutes. Quart jars are processed for 1 hour, 30 minutes.

To can dried beans, you must use a pressure canner.
When processing time is completed, turn off heat and let the canner cool until it reaches zero pressure.  Wait 5 additional minutes, then carefully remove lid. Let the jars cool for 5-10 minutes, then carefully remove jars from canner using canning tongs.

Place onto a dish towel (try not to place the jars directly onto kitchen counter. Variances in temperature could possibly cause jars to crack).  Let jars cool for 12 hours, then check to make sure they are properly sealed, then label and store in your pantry!

Garbanzo beans and pinto beans are canned and ready to store in pantry.

I’ve canned many jars since learning how to can dried beans. It is very convenient to not have to run to the grocery store when I need beans!  I’ve used the garbanzo beans for my homemade hummus, and the black and pinto beans in my homemade chili.

Pinto beans and black beans are canned and ready to store in pantry. Hope you will try to can dried beans, and enjoy stocking your pantry! It really is a fairly easy way to save lots of money, and to always have canned beans on hand!

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:
Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram: jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Have a WONDERFUL day!

Author's signatureRecipe Source:  “Ball Blue Book – Guide To Preserving”, copyright 2014, Hearthmark, LLC, page 111.

How To Can Dried Beans
Prep Time
1 hr 30 mins
Cook Time
1 hr 15 mins
Total Time
2 hrs 45 mins
 
It's easy and very economical to use a pressure canner to process and can dried beans (pinto, garbanzo, black, etc.), for long term storage and convenience.
Category: Canning
Cuisine: American
Keyword: can dried beans
Servings: 6 pints or 3 quarts
Calories Per Serving: 161 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 5 pounds dried beans (kidney, garbanzo, black, pinto Great Northern or cranberry)
  • Water , to fill jars
  • 3 teaspoons Salt
Instructions
  1. Wash dried beans under cool water, then drain. Place beans in a large saucepan. Fill pan with water until beans are fully covered by 2 inches of water (above beans). Bring to a boil; boil for 2 minutes. Remove pan from heat; let beans soak uncovered for an hour.
  2. After beans have soaked an hour, drain. Place drained beans back into large saucepan; add enough water to cover by two inches again. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to a very low boil. Cover the saucepan and let beans cook for 30 minutes.
  3. While the beans are cooking, prepare pressure canner, canning jars, lids and screw bands according to manufacturer instructions. When beans are done cooking, pack beans into prepared hot jars. Leave 1 inch headspace in each jar. Add 1/2 teaspoon salt to each jar. Ladle hot cooking liquid or clean boiling water over beans, being sure to leave a 1 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles from jars, then take a wet paper towel and make sure rims are clean. Center the flat lids on jars, then tighten screw bands to fingertip tight.
  4. Put filled jars onto rack and into pressure canner (which has 2-3 inches of simmering water). Put canner lid on, lock it into place, Turn heat to medium-high. Let the steam vent for 10 minutes, then put the weighted gauge over vent. Process beans at 10 pounds pressure. Pint jars are processed for 1 hour, 15 minutes. Quart jars are processed for 1 hour, 30 minutes.
  5. When processing time is completed, turn off heat and let canner cool until it reaches zero pressure. Wait 5 additional minutes, then carefully remove lid. Let the jars cool in pan for 5-10 minutes, then carefully remove jars from canner using canning tongs. Place hot jars on a dish towel (don't put jars directly onto kitchen counter. Variances in temperature could cause jars to crack). Let jars cool for 12 hours, then check to make sure they are properly sealed, then label and store in your pantry!
Nutrition Facts
How To Can Dried Beans
Amount Per Serving (0.25 cups)
Calories 161
% Daily Value*
Sodium 147mg6%
Potassium 700mg20%
Carbohydrates 29g10%
Fiber 7g29%
Sugar 1g1%
Protein 10g20%
Vitamin A 10IU0%
Calcium 58mg6%
Iron 2.4mg13%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!It's easy and very economical to use a pressure canner to process and can dried beans (pinto, garbanzo, black, etc.), for long term storage and convenience.

 

 

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

How To Can Dried Beans

2 Comments on How To Can Dried Beans

  1. Will these beans be fully cooked after they are canned? If not, how long will they need to be cooked when using after storage? Thanks for all the beautiful recipes you have shared!

    • Good morning, Elizabeth! Thanks for taking the time to write. Yes… the beans will be fully cooked after canning them. Once I open a jar, I rinse and drain them before adding them to another recipe (just like if you bought canned beans). Hope that helps. Thank you for your kind note… I think it is fun to share recipes I’ve discovered and made that are really yummy with others! Have a wonderful day!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

By using this Comment Form you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website. Your email address will not be published.