Category: Canning And Preserving

How To Can Apple Pie Filling

Learn how to can apple pie filling for your pantry! Once canned, having homemade pie filling already made for pies, cobblers, etc. is a real time saver!
Learn how to can apple pie filling for your pantry! Once canned, having homemade pie filling already made for pies, cobblers, etc. is a time saver!

Okay, lets be honest. Making canned apple pie filling takes some time to pull off, but can I remind you that the results will be worth it, in time saved down the road? You will be able to pull a jar right out of your pantry and whip up a dessert in much less time! YEEHAW!

This “recipe” came straight out of my treasured canning book called “Ball Complete Book Of Home Preserving”, and it’s a real keeper! Once made, you can use this apple pie filling for pies, cobblers or crisps, turnovers, or even as a topping for PANCAKES!

The recipe (as written below in the recipe card) will give you a yield of 3 quart jars (plus a pint) OR it will give you about 7 smaller pint jars of apple pie filling. **Please note that I DOUBLED the recipe, and made 7 QUART sized jars of pie filling (as shown in photos)!

Prepare Canning Equipment

Before canning apple pie filling, prepare quart (or pint) size canning jars, flat lids and screw bands, as well as a water bath canner, according to the manufacturer instructions, and USDA safe canning guidelines.

Prepare The Apples

There are several wonderful varieties of apples that are great for pie filling. A few that come to mind are Granny Smith, Honeycrisp, Jonathan, and my favorite, Gravensteins (shown below).

I love to go pick them at local U-Pick Farms! It takes quite a few apples to make 7 quarts, as you can imagine! Basically, each quart sized jar will require approximately 3 pounds of apples!

Picked some Gravenstein apples to use in many recipes.

Peel, remove the core, and slice the apples. Treat the apples with lemon juice, fruit fresh or follow my old-fashioned tip here, to keep the apples from darkening once exposed to air.

It will take about 3-40 minutes to peel, slice and treat all those apples. My suggestion is to get someone to help you, if possible! This is a GREAT way to get a friend or other family member involved, in order to save time! This is especially helpful if doubling the recipe!

Blanch The Apple Slices

You will need to blanch the apple slices (once they’re peeled , sliced and treated). Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add 6 cups of sliced apples at a time to the boiling water. Cook for 1 minute, then remove and keep them warm while you finish blanching all the apples.

Apples are peeled, cored, sliced and treated to prevent browning.

Prepare The Pie Filling

A lot of folks thicken pie fillings with flour or cornstarch. That’s fine for making a pie. However, when CANNING apple pie filling, these ingredients don’t hold up too well in storage, so a product called ClearJel (for cooking, not instant) is typically used. ClearJel is a type of cooking starch (approved for home canning) that can be ordered online from many retailers.

To make the pie filling, measure granulated sugar, ClearJel, water, apple juice, cinnamon and nutmeg into a LARGE stainless steel saucepan. Bring this to a boil on medium-high heat.

Stir constantly, and continue to cook until it starts to bubble and thickens. Add the lemon juice, and cook for 1 more minute, continuing to stir constantly! Take off heat when done.

The thickener for the apple pie filling is cooked until thickened.

Add The Apple Slices To Pie Filling

Transfer the warm (drained) apple slices to this thickened pie filling in the large saucepan, and fold them into the mixture. Heat the apple pie filling just until heated through, before placing the filling into your hot, prepared jars.

Time To Can Apple Pie Filling!

Once heated through, ladle the hot pie filling into prepared canning jars, being sure to leave 1 inch of headspace in each jar. Use a plastic utensil to remove the air bubbles from the jars, making adjustments to the headspace if necessary, by adding or removing filling.

Wipe the jar rims clean with a wet cloth or paper towel, to help ensure a good seal. Place flat lid centered on top, and add the jar ring. Screw the band on until it is fingertip tight.

How To Can Apple Pie Filling

Place the hot jars on an elevated rack and lower into simmering water in canner. Make sure that the water completely covers the tops of the jars (by about an inch). Place lid on canner.

Bring the water to a gentle rolling boil, and process the jars for 25 minutes AFTER it begins boiling. The processing time is the same for both pint and quart sized jars.

When you can apple pie filling, the jars must be processed in a water bath canner.

When processing time is finished, turn off heat, and carefully remove lid from the pan. Wait for 5-10 minutes, and then remove the HOT jars from the pan, using canning tongs.

Transfer jars to a dish towel on counter. IMPORTANT NOTE: Don’t place hot jars directly onto your counter top, as temperature variances (hot jars vs. cold counter top) might cause jars to crack.

Four jars of apple pie filling resting on dish towel after processing.

Let The Jars Cool Completely

Let the jars of apple pie filling cool completely (overnight or 12 hours) without disturbing. Once completely cooled, check to make sure jars sealed. The jar lids should have NO GIVE in them if properly sealed. If you find one has not sealed properly, it is not safe to store. Refrigerate it, and use it within a week.

Wipe the jars clean with a wet cloth, then label (with date canned), and place them in your pantry for long term storage. There you go… you just learned how to can apple pie filling!

The jars of apple pie filling are cleaned, seal is checked, and are labeled for storage.

Even though it is a labor-intensive process to make pie filling, the benefit comes later! It’s very convenient to make a pie, cobbler or dessert requiring apple pie filling by grabbing an “already made” jar right out of the pantry!

Looking For More CANNING Recipes?

You can find all of my canning recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. I have recipes for a variety of foods and jams. They include:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:
Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram: jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Author's signature

Original recipe source: my beloved “Ball Complete book Of Home Preserving”, published 2006, The Jarden Corporation, page 170.

How To Can Apple Pie Filling
Prep Time
45 mins
Cook Time
25 mins
Total Time
1 hr 10 mins
 

Learn how to can apple pie filling for your pantry! Once canned, having homemade pie filling already made for pies, cobblers, etc. is a time saver!

Category: Canning and Preserving, Dessert
Cuisine: American
Keyword: can apple pie filling
Servings: 7 pints (or 3 qts + 1 pint)
Calories Per Serving: 462 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 12 cups apples , peeled, cored, sliced, treated to prevent browning
  • cups granulated sugar
  • ¾ cup ClearJel
  • teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • ½ teaspoon ground nutmeg
  • cups cold water
  • cups unsweetened apple juice
  • ½ cup lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Prepare quart (or pint) size canning jars, flat lids and screw bands, and water bath canner, according to the manufacturer instructions, and USDA safe canning guidelines.

  2. Peel, remove the core, and slice the apples. Treat the apples with lemon juice (not from the ingredient list), fruit fresh or another method, to keep the apples from darkening once exposed to air. Once they're peeled , sliced and treated, blanch the slices . Bring a large pot of water to a boil. Add 6 cups of sliced apples at a time to the boiling water. Cook for 1 minute, then remove and keep them warm while you finish blanching all the apples.

  3. To make the pie filling, measure granulated sugar, ClearJel, water, apple juice, cinnamon and nutmeg into a LARGE stainless steel saucepan. Bring this to a boil on medium-high heat. Stir constantly, and continue to cook until it bubbles and thickens. Add ½ cup lemon juice, and cook for 1 more minute, stirring constantly! Take off heat when done. Transfer warm (drained) apple slices into pie filling in large saucepan, and fold them into the mixture. Re-heat filling only until heated through, before placing the filling into hot, prepared jars.

  4. Ladle hot pie filling into prepared canning jars, leaving 1 inch of headspace in each jar. Use a long utensil inserted several times into jars, to remove the air bubbles, making adjustments to the headspace if necessary, by adding or removing filling. Wipe jar rims clean, to help ensure a good seal. Place flat lid on top, and add the jar ring. Screw the band on until it is fingertip tight. Place the hot jars onto an elevated rack and lower rack and jars into simmering water in canner. Make sure the water completely covers the tops of the jars (by about an inch). Place lid on canner.

  5. Bring the water to a gentle rolling boil, and process the jars for 25 minutes AFTER it begins boiling. When processing time is finished, turn off heat. Remove lid from pan. Wait 5-10 minutes, and then remove the VERY HOT jars from the pan, using canning tongs. Transfer jars to a dish towel on counter. IMPORTANT NOTE: Don't place hot jars directly onto your counter top, as temperature variances (boiling hot jars vs. cold counter top) might cause jars to crack. Let the jars of apple pie filling cool completely (overnight or 12 hours) without disturbing.

  6. Once completely cooled, check to make sure jars sealed. The jar lids should have NO GIVE in them if properly sealed. If you find one has not sealed properly, it is not safe to store. Refrigerate it, and use it within a couple weeks. Wipe the jars clean with a wet cloth, then label (with date canned), and place them in your pantry for long term storage. Enjoy!

Recipe Notes

NOTE: If treating apples with lemon juice to prevent browning, you will need a couple extra lemons for this purpose.

Nutrition Facts
How To Can Apple Pie Filling
Amount Per Serving (1 g)
Calories 462 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 9mg0%
Potassium 337mg10%
Carbohydrates 120g40%
Fiber 6g25%
Sugar 110g122%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 116IU2%
Vitamin C 17mg21%
Calcium 25mg3%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Learn how to can apple pie filling for your pantry! Once canned, having homemade pie filling already made for pies, cobblers, etc. is a time saver!

How To Can Pineapple

Learn how to can pineapple (chunks or spears), for long term storage. Buy fresh pineapple on sale and can it for convenience, and to enjoy year round.
Learn how to can pineapple (chunks or spears), for long term storage. Buy fresh pineapple on sale and can it for convenience, and to enjoy year round.

Have you ever wondered how to can pineapple? Well I have, and my curiosity led me back once again, to my trusty canning book called “Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving”. I can’t tell you how much I have relied on this handy “cookbook” over the years.

Guess what? Canning pineapple is not too difficult at all! I enjoyed learning how to can pineapple, and have used this recipe several times to prepare canned pineapple for our home pantry (especially handy when pineapples are on sale)!

Even though it’s easy for most folks to buy canned pineapple at the grocery store, home canning is a great skill to have toward becoming more self-reliant! It’s convenient to have home canned food in storage when there is really bad weather, an emergency, or you just can’t get to the store!

You will need to have a water bath canner, some fresh, sweet and RIPE pineapples, water and little sugar (for the syrup), plus canning jars and lids, but that’s it! The “process” is quite simple, and I would like to share it with you today!

A Couple Important Things You Need To Know

There are a couple things you need to know about how to can pineapple:

  • Prepare canner, jars and lids according to manufacturer instructions and USDA safe canning guidelines. Make sure they are clean, hot, and ready to go, before you heat the pineapple in the syrup.
  • If using PINT sized jars , you will need about 1½ pounds of pineapple per jar.
  • If using QUART sized jars, you will need about 3 pounds of pineapple per jar.

I used pint sized jars and made a very small batch (which is reflected in my photos). You can easily double or triple the amount of pineapple you wish to can.

The printable recipe card at the bottom of this post gives the ingredients to make 2 pints, but you can easily change the quantity of the ingredients! Use the calculator in the recipe card, to see ingredients necessary to can your desired amount of jars.

Prepare The Pineapple For Canning

You will need to remove the crown, peel, core and slice the fresh pineapple into spears or chunks before processing. To do this, first slice off both ends of the pineapple, stand it upright, and then slice away the peel (from top to bottom) all around the pineapple.

Use a sharp knife, and don’t forget to carve out all the little brown “eyes” on the pineapple!

Remove the crown and peel, to prepare the fruit for processing.All the peel and brown "eyes" are cut out of the pineapple before slicing.

Once peeled, slice the pineapple in half, from top to bottom. Remove the middle core, because it is really fibrous and a bit “woody”.

If you are canning pineapple spears, cut the cored pineapple into long spears. Remember that the spears will have to fit into the jars with a ½ inch headspace. If canning pineapple chunks (this is what I did), cut the fruit into spears, and then slice each spear into bite-sized chunks (about 1 inch each). Set aside.

Core is cut out of the fresh pineapple.Pineapple spears are cut (or it is cut into chunks), for canning.

Make Extra Light Syrup For Canning The Pineapple

You will need to quickly make a syrup to can the pineapple in. Syrups are comprised of sugar and water, and they can range from really sweet to really light on the sugar spectrum. I canned my pineapple chunks in extra light syrup, because they are already naturally sweet.

I forgot to take a photo, but measure water and sugar into a large stainless steel saucepan.  Stir to combine. Bring this mixture to a boil on MEDIUM-HIGH heat, stirring constantly as the sugar dissolves. Once sugar dissolves and syrup comes to a boil, turn the heat down to LOW.

Add the pineapple chunks to the hot syrup, and heat, stirring often, only until pineapple has been heated through. This will take only about 1 minute. If you are canning LOTS of jars of pineapple, do this step in batches, keeping each batch warm. Remove from heat, and fill jars.

How To Can Pineapple

Fill the hot prepared canning jars with the pineapple pieces. Using a slotted spoon is extremely helpful to remove them from the hot syrup. Pack the pineapple into jars to withing 1/2 inch of the top.

Use a ladle to fill jar and cover the pineapple pieces with hot syrup, remembering to leave a 1/2 inch headspace in jar. Use a plastic utensil inserted into the jars to remove the air bubbles, and adjust the headspace, if necessary.

Preparing the equipment (jars, lids & canner) is part of learning how to can food.

Wipe the rims of jars clean with a wet cloth. This helps to remove any syrup that might cause jar not to seal. Apply the flat lid, and screw on the band, to fingertip tightness. Repeat process with remaining jar(s).

A flat lid is ready to place on a filled canning jar, before processing.

Processing times For Canning Pineapple

Place filled jars onto an elevated rack, and lower them into simmering water in canner. Make sure the water covers the entire jar by at least one inch above the top. Place lid on canner, and then bring the water to a gentle rolling boil.

Process PINT jars for 15 minutes AFTER water comes to a boil. Process QUART jars for 20 minutes AFTER water comes to a boil. When done, turn off heat, remove canner lid, and wait for about 5 minutes before removing hot jars using canning tongs.

Jars are processed in a water bath canner.

Place the HOT jars onto a dish towel. Avoid placing jars directly on your counter top, because temperature variances (cold counter versus boiling HOT jars) could cause jars to crack. Nobody wants THAT!

Let jars cool completely for 12 hours or overnight without disturbing. Once they are completely cool, wipe jars to remove any sticky residue, label, and store in pantry (or other cool, dark area).

Just like that, you learned how to can pineapple in jars for long term storage!

That’s it! You just learned how to can pineapple! It honestly isn’t that labor intensive, if you ask me. I LOVE the convenience of having jars of delicious home canned pineapple in our pantry, to conveniently have to use in various recipes!

Thanks for visiting, and I hope you will consider trying this recipe for canning pineapple! Have a GREAT day.

Looking For More CANNING Recipes?

You can find all of my canning recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. I have a variety of canning recipes available, including:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:
Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram: jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Author's signature

Original recipe source: “Ball Complete Book Of Home Preserving, published 2006 by The Jarden Corporation, page 152 (pineapple) and page 142 (syrup)

How To Can Pineapple
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
15 mins
Total Time
35 mins
 

Learn how to can pineapple (chunks or spears), for long term storage. Buy fresh pineapple on sale and can it for convenience, and to enjoy year round.

Category: Canning and Preserving
Cuisine: American
Keyword: how to can pineapple
Servings: 2 pint jars
Calories Per Serving: 437 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 3 pounds pineapple , cut into bite sized chunks
For Extra Light Syrup
  • ½ cup granulated sugar
  • 5 cups water
Instructions
  1. Remove the crown, peel, core and slice fresh, RIPE pineapple into spears or 1" chunks before processing. Set aside.

  2. Measure water and sugar into a large stainless steel saucepan.  Stir to combine. Bring this mixture to a boil on MEDIUM-HIGH heat, stirring constantly as sugar dissolves. Once sugar dissolves and syrup comes to a boil, turn heat down to LOW. Add the pineapple chunks to the hot syrup, and heat, stirring often, only until pineapple has been heated through (about 1 minute). Remove from heat, and fill jars.

  3. Fill warm, prepared canning jars with the hot pineapple pieces. Using a slotted spoon is extremely helpful to remove them from the hot syrup. Pack the pineapple into jars to within 1/2 inch of the top. Use a ladle to fill jar and cover the pineapple pieces with hot syrup, remembering to leave a 1/2 inch headspace in jar. Use a plastic utensil inserted into the jars to remove the air bubbles, and adjust the headspace, if necessary. Wipe rims of jars clean with a wet cloth. This helps to remove any syrup that might cause jar not to seal. Apply the flat lid, and screw on the band, to fingertip tightness. Repeat process with remaining jar(s).

  4. Place filled jars onto an elevated rack, and lower them into simmering water in canner. Make sure the water covers the entire jar by at least one inch above the top. Place lid on canner, and then bring water to a gentle rolling boil. Process PINT jars for 15 minutes AFTER water comes to a boil. Process QUART jars for 20 minutes AFTER water comes to a boil. When done, turn off heat, remove canner lid, and wait for about 5 minutes before removing hot jars using canning tongs.

  5. Place HOT jars onto a dish towel. Avoid placing jars directly on your counter top, because temperature variances (cold counter versus boiling HOT jars) could cause jars to crack. Let jars cool completely for 12 hours or overnight without disturbing. Once completely cool, wipe jars to remove any sticky residue, label, and store in pantry (or other cool, dark area).

Recipe Notes

Note: Caloric calculation was based on using half of the extra light syrup to fill 2 pint jars (you won't need it all for 2 pint jars). Syrup recipe as written will yield about 5¼ cups syrup total. 

If canning in QUART sized jars, you will need approximately 3 pounds of pineapple and about 1 to 1½ cups syrup per quart jar. Quart sized jars should be processed for 20 minutes.

Nutrition Facts
How To Can Pineapple
Amount Per Serving (1 g)
Calories 437 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 7mg0%
Potassium 742mg21%
Carbohydrates 114g38%
Fiber 10g42%
Sugar 92g102%
Protein 4g8%
Vitamin A 395IU8%
Vitamin C 325mg394%
Calcium 88mg9%
Iron 2mg11%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Learn how to can pineapple (chunks or spears), for long term storage. Buy fresh pineapple on sale and can it for convenience, and to enjoy year round.

How To Can Corn

Learn how to can corn for long term storage! Enjoy having jars of home canned corn in your pantry to enjoy a taste of summer’s bounty all year round. Learn how to can corn for long term storage! Enjoy having jars of home canned corn in your pantry to enjoy a taste of summer's bounty all year round.

Do you enjoy corn on the cob like we do? YUM! I get so excited when all the fresh picked corn on the cob hits our grocery stores and farmers markets each summer. It’s so delicious, and I’m really glad I learned how to can corn many years ago, so it can be preserved for long term storage!

Yep… I LOVE corn… on the cob, off the cob, and at the local county fair!

Can you tell I LOVE corn?

So Can I Learn How To Can Corn?

Sure. Anybody can learn how to can corn. You will need to have a pressure canner, however, because corn is a low-acid food. Low-acid foods must be cooked at a really high temperature (under pressure) to preserve it for long term storage. The high temperatures help destroy any bacteria present that could potentially harm you.

Before you begin working on the corn, gather your canning equipment, lids, canning jars, etc. and get them sanitized, heated, and ready to go, according to manufacturer instructions.

Prep The Corn

For each PINT jar, you will need approximately 4 medium long ears of fresh corn on the cob. Each QUART jar will need about 8 ears. So… figure out how many jars you want, and plan accordingly!

Remove the husks and the corn silk from each ear of corn, and rinse corn ears.  Slice off the kernels into a large bowl, using a sharp, serrated knife.

Each ear of corn must be husked and have any silk removed.

Filling The Jars

There are TWO methods that can be used in canning corn… the HOT PACK and the RAW PACK method (I use the raw pack). Here are both methods:

  • RAW PACK: Loosely pack the corn kernels into hot, prepared canning jars. being sure to leave a generous 1″ headspace in each jar. Do NOT press the corn down into the jar. Pour boiling water into each jar, and adjust headspace, if necessary to keep a 1″ headspace.
  • HOT PACK: Measure the corn out into a large stainless steel saucepan. For every 4 cups of corn kernels, add 1 cup of boiling water. Turn heat under pan to medium-high. Bring liquid to boil. Once boiling, reduce heat, and boil (gently) for 5 minutes, to heat the corn through. Ladle the hot corn AND the cooking liquid into jars, leaving a 1″ headspace in each jar.

Jars must be sterilized and heated before adding the vegetables to be canned.

Remove the air bubbles from each jar, by inserting a plastic utensil into jars several times. Wipe the jar rims clean with a cloth (to help ensure a good seal). Place prepared flat lid on jars, then screw the ring band on until fingertip tight.

It's fairly easy to learn how to can corn and then process jars in a pressure canner.

Carefully load the hot jars onto rack in the water in your prepared pressure canner. Lock the lid, and then bring the water to a boil over medium-high heat.

How Long to Process Jars

Let the steam vent for 10 minutes, and then close (or place cover on) the vent. Continue to heat until the pressure canner reaches 10 pounds pressure, and begin processing. Maintain this pressure throughout the processing time for the canned corn. Start the timing once the canner reaches 10 pounds pressure.

Process PINT jars (500 mL) for 55 minutes. Process QUART jars (1 L) for 85 minutes at 10 pounds pressure.

Filled jars are processed at 10 pounds of pressure.

Once Processing Is Done

When processing time is complete, turn off the heat. Let the pressure drop NATURALLY to 0 on the pressure canner. Do NOT attempt to open the lid until pressure has completely dropped to 0!

Once the pressure gauge reaches 0, wait 2 minutes longer, then open the vent (or remove vent cover). Carefully remove the canner lid. Wait 10 more minutes, then carefully remove and transfer hot jars to a dish towel on counter. Don’t set boiling jars directly on counter, because temperature variances between hot jars and cool counter could cause jars to crack.

Let the jars cool for at least 12 hours (or overnight) without disturbing. Once completely cool, wipe jars clean, label, test the lids to ensure they have all properly sealed, and store them in your pantry.

TIP: To test seal, remove the screw band. Use a finger and press down in the center of the flat lid. There should be NO give at all if sealed correctly.

Label the cooled jars, and remove screwbands before storing home canned corn.

Hope you found it helpful learning how to can corn.  I enjoy knowing I have quite a few jars of summer corn stored up in our pantry to use throughout the year! Have a great day.

Looking For More CANNING Recipes?

You can find all of my canning recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. I have quite a few, including:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:
Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram: jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Author's signature

Original recipe source: “Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving”, published 2012, The Jarden Corporation, pages 388 and 385.

How To Can Corn
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
55 mins
Total Time
1 hr 10 mins
 

Learn how to can corn for long term storage! Enjoy having jars of home canned corn in your pantry to enjoy a taste of summer's bounty all year round.

Category: Canning and Preserving, Vegetables
Cuisine: American
Keyword: how to can corn
Servings: 3 pints
Calories Per Serving: 310 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 12 ears corn on the cob (large ears)
  • teaspoons canning salt, (if using-optional) (only use ½ teaspoon per jar)
Instructions
  1. Gather canning equipment, lids, canning jars, etc. and get them sanitized, heated, and ready to go, according to manufacturer instructions.

    For each PINT jar, you will need approximately 4 medium long ears of fresh corn on the cob. Each QUART jar will need about 8 ears.

  2. Remove husks and corn silk from corn, then rinse.  Slice off kernels into a large bowl, using a sharp, serrated knife. There are TWO methods that can be used in canning corn:

    RAW PACK: Loosely pack corn kernels into hot, prepared canning jars. leaving a generous 1" headspace in each jar. Do NOT press the corn down into the jar. Pour boiling water into each jar, and adjust headspace, if necessary to keep a 1" headspace.

    HOT PACK: Measure corn into a large stainless steel saucepan. For every 4 cups of corn kernels, add 1 cup of boiling water. Turn heat under pan to medium-high. Bring liquid to boil. Once boiling, reduce heat, and boil (gently) for 5 minutes, to heat corn through. Ladle hot corn AND cooking liquid into jars, leaving a 1" headspace in each jar.

  3. Remove air bubbles from jars, by inserting a plastic utensil into jar several times. Wipe jar rims clean with a cloth (to help ensure a good seal). Place prepared flat lid on jars, then screw the ring band on until fingertip tight.

  4. Load hot jars onto rack in water in prepared pressure canner. Lock lid, and then bring the water to a boil over medium-high heat. Let the steam vent for 10 minutes, and then close (or place cover on) the vent. Continue to heat until pressure canner reaches 10 pounds pressure, and begin processing. Maintain this pressure throughout processing time. Start the timer once canner reaches 10 pounds pressure. Process PINT jars (500 mL) for 55 minutes. Process QUART jars (1 L) for 85 minutes at 10 pounds pressure.

  5. When processing is complete, turn off heat. Let pressure drop NATURALLY to 0 on the pressure canner. Do NOT attempt to open lid until pressure has completely dropped to 0! Once pressure reaches 0, wait 2 minutes longer, then open vent (or remove vent cover). Carefully remove canner lid. Wait 10 more minutes, then carefully remove and transfer hot jars to a dish towel on counter. Don't set boiling jars directly on counter, because temperature variances between hot jars and cool counter could cause jars to crack. Let jars cool for 12 hours without disturbing. Once completely cool, wipe jars clean, label, test the lids to ensure they have all properly sealed, and store them in your pantry. TIP: To test seal, remove the screw band. Use a finger and press down in the center of the flat lid. There should be NO give at all if sealed correctly. If jar did not seal properly, store in refrigerator and use within a day or two.

Nutrition Facts
How To Can Corn
Amount Per Serving (1 pint)
Calories 310 Calories from Fat 45
% Daily Value*
Fat 5g8%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 54mg2%
Potassium 972mg28%
Carbohydrates 67g22%
Fiber 7g29%
Sugar 23g26%
Protein 12g24%
Vitamin A 673IU13%
Vitamin C 24mg29%
Calcium 7mg1%
Iron 2mg11%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Learn how to can corn for long term storage! Enjoy having jars of home canned corn in your pantry to enjoy a taste of summer's bounty all year round.

How To Can Asparagus

Learn how to can asparagus for long term storage, using a pressure canner. Once fresh asparagus is canned, it’s shelf stable, & ready for your pantry!
Learn how to can asparagus for long term storage, using a pressure canner. Once fresh asparagus is canned, it's shelf stable, & ready for your pantry!

It has been such a fun project, learning how to can different soups, vegetables, jams, and fruits since learning basic canning techniques.  This “recipe” for how to can asparagus is a pressure canning recipe, and I am happy to share it with you today.

Please note that you will need a pressure canner to do this, since asparagus is a low-acid food. Low acid foods (most veggies, meats, and soups) require higher temps, achieved through pressure canning, to be safely canned for storage.

Prepare Canning Equipment Before Beginning

Before beginning, make sure to have your pressure canner, canning jars, flat lids and screwbands prepped and ready, according to manufacturer instructions and USDA guidelines.

If you are at higher altitudes (above 1,000 feet), or are using a dial gauge pressure canner, make sure to refer to the instruction manual for your pressure canner for additional info.

Prepare The Fresh Asparagus For Canning

Rinse the asparagus really well, and then drain. Snap off the tough (woody) ends of each stalk (discard ends). There are two methods to can asparagus. I prefer the hot pack method, but the choice is yours:

RAW PACK METHOD: You can either leave asparagus whole and tightly pack them, stem down into jar, or cut into 1″ pieces and tightly pack jar. Leave 1″ headspace in the jars. Raw veggies will shrink more during the canning process, so pack ’em in there.

HOT PACK METHOD: This is the method shown below.  Cut each asparagus stalk into 1″ long pieces. Place in large pot or skillet and add water, to fully cover asparagus. Turn the heat to medium-high, and bring the water to a boil. Boil for 3 minutes, and the asparagus should be tender-crisp.

Drain the asparagus, but save the cooking water for the jars (if desired). Pack the asparagus tightly into jars, leaving 1″ of headspace in the jars.

Fresh asparagus is cut and then quick boiled, before placing into canning jars.

Filling The Jars

If you want to add canning salt to the asparagus, add 1/2 teaspoon canning salt to each PINT jar, and 1 teaspoon canning salt to each QUART jar.

Carefully ladle the boiling water into each jar to cover the asparagus (and still leave a 1″ headspace). Remove the air bubbles from each jar, by inserting a knife or plastic utensil into jars in several places. Adjust the headspace, if necessary.

Wipe the rims of the jars clean, and then place flat lids and screwband onto jars. Tighten bands to fingertip tightness.

Canning jars and funnel used to pour asparagus into jars.

How To Can Asparagus – Processing Times

Once jars of asparagus are sealed, place them into your pressure canner. Make sure to adjust the water level if necessary, according to your canner’s manufacturer instructions.

Lock the lid, and then bring the water to a boil, on medium-high heat. Vent the steam (vent open) for 10 minutes once boiling, and THEN close the vent or add vent cover.

Continue to heat the canner until it reaches 10# (pounds) pressure. You need to maintain 10# pressure the entire processing time. Process PINTS for 30 minutes, and QUARTS for 40 minutes.

Canned asparagus is processed at 10 pounds pressure, as shown on the canner gauge.

Processing Time Is Complete – Now What?

Once processing time is complete, turn off the heat, and let the pressure in the canner drop NATURALLY until it reaches 0 (zero pressure). Open the vent (or remove vent cover), and let the steam vent for 2 more minutes.

Carefully open lid. Wait for 10 more minutes, and then carefully remove jars of canned asparagus with canning tongs. Set the hot jars onto a dish towel, to avoid jars cracking due to temperature variances of various types of countertops.

I'm glad I learned how to can asparagus so I can keep it on hand in our pantry!

Let the jars cool completely (12 hours or overnight) without disturbing. Once cool, check to ensure the jars have sealed properly, wipe jars clean, and label them.

You have now learned how to can asparagus, and the properly sealed jars are now ready for long term storage in your pantry! Congratulations!

Jars of canned asparagus are labeled and ready to store in pantry.

I hope you will consider canning fresh asparagus. It’s very convenient to pull a jar out of the pantry and whip up asparagus soup or add the asparagus to another dish!

The recipe, as written below, will make 2 pint jars, but the recipe below has a feature to let you calculate the exact amount of jars you wish to make. Once you add the number you want, it will adjust the ingredient amount automatically.

Looking For More PRESSURE CANNING Recipes?

You can find all of my recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. A few pressure canning recipes you might be interested in include:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:
Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
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Author's signature

Original recipe source: The Ball Complete book of Home Preserving, copyright 2006, published by The Jarden Corporation, page 386

How To Can Asparagus
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
30 mins
Total Time
45 mins
 

Learn how to can asparagus for long term storage, using a pressure canner. Once fresh asparagus is canned, it's shelf stable, & ready for your pantry!

Category: Canning and Preserving, Vegetables
Cuisine: American
Keyword: how to can asparagus
Servings: 2 pints
Calories Per Serving: 91 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 2 pounds fresh asparagus
  • Boiling Water
  • canning salt (OPTIONAL)
Instructions
  1. Have pressure canner, canning jars, flat lids and screwbands prepped and ready, according to manufacturer instructions and USDA guidelines. If at higher altitudes (above 1,000 feet), or are using a dial gauge pressure canner, make sure to refer to instruction manual for your pressure canner for additional info.

  2. Rinse asparagus well, and then drain. Snap off tough (woody) ends and discard. There are two methods to can asparagus. RAW PACK METHOD: You can either leave asparagus whole and tightly pack them, stem down into jar, or cut into 1" pieces and tightly pack jar. Leave 1" headspace. HOT PACK METHOD: This is the method I use. Cut each asparagus stalk into 1" long pieces. Place in large pot or skillet and add water, to fully cover asparagus. Turn heat to medium-high, and bring water to a boil. Boil for 3 minutes; asparagus should be tender-crisp. Drain asparagus, but save the cooking water for jars (if desired). Pack asparagus tightly into jars, leaving 1" of headspace.

  3. If adding canning salt to the asparagus, add 1/2 teaspoon to each PINT jar, and 1 teaspoon to each QUART jar. Carefully ladle boiling water into each jar to cover asparagus (still leaving 1" headspace). Remove air bubbles from each jar. Adjust headspace, if necessary. Wipe rims of the jars clean, and place flat lids and screwband onto jars. Tighten bands to fingertip tightness.

  4. Once jars are sealed, place them into prepared pressure canner. Adjust the water level if necessary, according to your canner's manufacturer instructions. Lock lid, and bring water to a boil, on medium-high heat. Vent the steam (vent open) for 10 minutes once boiling, and THEN close vent or add vent cover. Continue to heat until it reaches 10# (pounds) pressure. You need to maintain 10# pressure the entire processing time. Process PINTS for 30 minutes, and QUARTS for 40 minutes after pressure has been reached.

  5. When processing is complete, turn off heat, and let the pressure in the canner drop NATURALLY until it reaches 0 (zero pressure). Open the vent (or remove vent cover), and let steam vent for 2 more minutes. Carefully unlock and open lid. Wait for 10 more minutes, and then remove hot jars with canning tongs. Set the hot jars onto a dish towel, to avoid jars cracking due to countertop temperature variances. Let jars cool completely (12 hours or overnight) without disturbing. Once cool, check to ensure the jars have sealed properly, wipe jars clean, and label them. Store in pantry.

Recipe Notes

NOTE: If using QUART sized jars, please know that EACH quart jar will require about 3 1/2 pounds of asparagus.

Nutrition Facts
How To Can Asparagus
Amount Per Serving (1 pint jar)
Calories 91 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 9mg0%
Potassium 916mg26%
Carbohydrates 18g6%
Fiber 10g42%
Sugar 9g10%
Protein 10g20%
Vitamin A 3430IU69%
Vitamin C 25.4mg31%
Calcium 109mg11%
Iron 9.7mg54%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Learn how to can asparagus for long term storage, using a pressure canner. Once fresh asparagus is canned, it's shelf stable, & ready for your pantry!

How To Can Peach Pie Filling

Learn how to can peach pie filling for long term storage in this tutorial. Enjoy the convenience of having jars of pie filling stored away in your pantry, to use year round!
Learn how to can peach pie filling for long term storage in this tutorial. Enjoy the convenience of having jars of pie filling stored in your pantry.

Do you enjoy peach pie? We sure do, and this recipe will teach you how to can peach pie filling, to enjoy year round, long after fresh peaches are out of season!

I LOVE To Use Freshly Picked Peaches In My Recipes!

There is a local U-Pick peach farm a few miles from our home, and I love to pick fresh peaches every summer! The peaches have been used to make peach jam, peach pie, streusel topped galettes, canned peaches, peach turnovers, and this canned pie filling!

I have also enjoyed making peach salsa, old-fashioned peach crisp, canned peach salsa, and even peach smoothies and ice cream using fresh-picked peaches! There’s just no end to what you can do with a delicious, ripe peach!

Freshly picked peaches, ready to use to make pie filling!

Before beginning, make sure you have all your canning supplies ready! Prepare jars, lids, and a water bath canner according to manufacturer instructions, and safe canning guidelines.

Canning peach pie filling requires some work to get the peaches (and the pie filling) ready! It takes a bit of time to work through each step, but the end result is absolutely worth your time! Stick with it, read the directions thoroughly before beginning, and then go for it!

Peeling All Those Peaches Is Easy Using This Method

A lot of people use a knife to hand peel all the peaches needed, and that is perfectly okay, but I’d like to show you another option! There’s a slightly quicker method for peeling large amounts of peaches quickly.  Bring a large pot of water to a full boil. Place peaches (whole) 3-4 at a time into the boiling water for 45 seconds to 1 minute.

Immediately remove and place them into large bowl full of ice water, to stop the cooking. After this, the peels should come off the peaches very easily with a gentle rub! Repeat process, making sure water is boiling, and bowl of water is ice cold for each batch. Continue until all peaches are peeled.

Peaches are dipped in boiling water, then ice water to remove peels.

Slice, Treat, And Heat Peach Slices

I didn’t take a photo of this (oops), but remove the peach pits, and then slice the peeled peaches into 1/2″- 3/4″ slices. You will want to drop the slices as you cut them into a large bowl of a light syrup (see NOTE below), or use a product like Fruit Fresh, to prevent the slices from browning. Because there is such a large amount of peaches necessary for canning, you definitely don’t want to skip this step!

NOTE: If using a light syrup, heat 1/2 cup sugar into 5 cups of water only until sugar is dissolved. Pour into bowl, and then toss in the peach slices as you cut them. If using Fruit Fresh, follow package instructions.

Heat The Treated Peach Slices

Bring a large pot of water to a full boil.Drain the treated peach slices, and then place them in the boiling water (about 6-7 cups at a time). Bring the water back to a boil, and then let the peaches cook for only 1 minute.

Remove, and then drain peaches (and keep them warm), and continue process until all peaches have been cooked for 1 minute. You will end up needing a total of about 6 quarts worth of cooked peaches.

Prepare Thickener For The Pie Filling

In another separate large pan, mix the granulated sugar, Clear Jel and water. Heat on medium-high heat, stirring often, until it begins to thicken, and gets bubbly. **In case you are curious, Clear Jel is a powdered, safe thickening agent that can be purchased online. It is preferred in canning pie fillings using high heat, over the use of flour or cornstarch**.

Add the cinnamon and the bottled lemon juice to the pan, and let it boil for 1 more minute. Yes… use all that bottled lemon juice (it’s for long term preservation). It will not affect the taste of your pie filling.

Now add all of the warm peach slices, and give it all a good stir to fully combine ingredients. Continue to cook for 3 minutes, stirring the peach pie filling constantly (sorry, no photo).

Water, sugar and Clear Gel cooking in a pan.

The sugary mixture for peach pie filling has thickened up in the pan.

Time To Add The Peach Pie Filling To The Canning Jars

Whew… we are almost ready to finally can some peach pie filling! Okay… here’s what you need to do!

Fill each of the hot, prepared canning jars (I use quart size), being sure to leave a 1″ headspace. Remove the air bubbles, and then using a wet cloth or paper towel, clean the rims of the jars, so they are free of sticky residue (for a good seal).

Add the flat lids and twist the screwbands on, until they are fingertip tight.

The peach pie filling is ladled into the hot canning jars.

Can Peach Pie Filling

Place the jars of canned peach pie filling onto an elevated canning rack and place the rack with jars carefully into simmering water in the canner. The hot water needs to be about an inch ABOVE the tops of the jars once jars are in the canner before processing.

Bring the water in the canner to a gentle boil, and then process jars (both pints or quarts) for 30 minutes after the water comes to a boil.

Jars of pie filling are loaded onto rack and then are placed in a water bath canner.

Jars of peach pie filling being processed in a water bath canner.

Once fully processed, carefully remove the HOT jars of peach pie filling from the canner using canning tongs, and place them onto a dish towel. Do NOT place the hot jars directly onto your kitchen counter, because they could crack due to temperature variances (hot jars/cold counter).

Finished jars of canned peach pie filling, cooling on counter.

Let the jars cool, undisturbed for 12-24 hours. You should hear them “ping” as the jars seal. Once cooled, check the seal on each jar to ensure they have sealed properly and are ready (and safe) for long term storage.

Wipe down the cooled jars, label them, and add them to your pantry! Now you can make peach pie any time you want!

Labeled jars of peach pie filling have cooled and are ready to store in pantry.

Made a peach pie!

Yes, it IS a bit of work to can peach pie filling, but it sure is nice to have several jars put away for a quick pie months later (long after summer peaches have disappeared from stores).

I hope you will give this recipe a try! Thanks for visiting, and have a great day!

Looking For More CANNING Recipes?

You can find all of my canning recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. I have many canning recipes, with instructions, for foods and jams. A few of the canned items you might want to try include:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:
Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram: jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Author's signature

Original Recipe Source: https://www.simplycanning.com/peach-pie-recipes.html

How To Can Peach Pie Filling
Prep Time
1 hr
Cook Time
30 mins
Total Time
1 hr 30 mins
 

Learn how to can peach pie filling for long term storage in this tutorial. Enjoy the convenience of having jars of pie filling stored in your pantry.

Category: Canning and Preserving, Dessert
Cuisine: American
Keyword: can peach pie filling
Servings: 7 quarts
Calories Per Serving: 1105 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 6 quarts fresh peaches , enough to make 6 quarts sliced)
  • 7 cups granulated sugar
  • 2 cups + 3 Tbsp. Clear Jel
  • cups cold water
  • teaspoons cinnamon
  • cups bottled lemon juice
Instructions
  1. Before beginning, make sure to have all your canning supplies ready! Prepare jars, lids, and a water bath canner according to manufacturer instructions, and safe canning guidelines.

  2. Peel peaches with a knife OR bring a large pot of water to a boil. Place peaches (whole) 3-4 at a time into boiling water for 45 seconds to 1 minute. Immediately remove and place them into large bowl full of ice water, to stop cooking. After this, the peel should come off easily with a gentle rub! Repeat process, making sure water is boiling, and bowl of water is ice cold for each batch. Continue until all peaches are peeled. Remove peach pits, and slice peaches into 1/2"- 3/4" slices. Drop the slices as you cut them into a large bowl of a light syrup (see NOTE below), or use a product like Fruit Fresh, to prevent slices from browning. NOTE: If using a light syrup, heat 1/2 cup sugar into 5 cups of water only until sugar is dissolved. Pour into bowl, and then toss in the peach slices as you cut them. If using Fruit Fresh, follow package instructions.
    Bring a large pot of water to a full boil. Drain treated peach slices, and place them in the boiling water (6-7 cups at a time). Bring water back to a boil, and then let peaches cook for 1 minute. Remove, and drain peaches (and keep them warm). Continue until all peaches have been cooked. You need a total of 6 quarts of cooked peach slices.

  3. In a separate large pan, mix granulated sugar, Clear Jel and water. Heat on medium-high heat, stirring often, until it begins to thicken, and gets bubbly. Add cinnamon and bottled lemon juice to the pan; let it boil for 1 more minute. Yes... use all that bottled lemon juice (it's for long term preservation). It will not affect the taste of your pie filling. Now fold in warm peach slices, to fully combine ingredients. Continue to cook for 3 minutes, stirring the peach pie filling constantly.

  4. Fill each of the hot, prepared canning jars, being sure to leave a 1" headspace. Remove air bubbles by inserting a plastic knife several times into jars, adjust headspace if necessary, and use a wet cloth or paper towel to clean the rims of the jars, so they are free of sticky residue (for a good seal). Add the flat lids and twist screwbands on, until fingertip tight. Place jars onto an elevated canning rack and place rack carefully into simmering water in the canner. The hot water needs to be about an inch ABOVE the tops of the jars once jars are in the canner before processing. Bring the water in the canner to a gentle boil, and then process jars (both pints or quarts) for 30 minutes after water comes to a gentle boil.

  5. Once fully processed, carefully remove HOT jars of peach pie filling from the water bath using canning tongs, and place them on a dish towel on counter. Do NOT place hot jars directly onto kitchen counter, because they could crack due to temperature variances (hot jars/cold counter). Let jars cool, undisturbed for 12-24 hours. Once cooled, check the seal on each jar to ensure they have sealed properly and are ready and safe for long term storage. Wipe jars clean, label, and store in pantry. Enjoy!

Nutrition Facts
How To Can Peach Pie Filling
Amount Per Serving (1 quart jar)
Calories 1105 Calories from Fat 18
% Daily Value*
Fat 2g3%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 12mg1%
Potassium 1604mg46%
Carbohydrates 282g94%
Fiber 13g54%
Sugar 269g299%
Protein 8g16%
Vitamin A 2645IU53%
Vitamin C 77.1mg93%
Calcium 64mg6%
Iron 2.2mg12%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Learn how to can peach pie filling for long term storage in this tutorial. Enjoy the convenience of having jars of pie filling stored in your pantry.

Cowboy Candy (candied jalapenos)

Cowboy Candy (also known as candied jalapenos) tastes great on cream cheese covered crackers (as an appetizer), or on grilled burgers or hot dogs! It’s easy to can them for long term storage.
Cowboy Candy (also known as candied jalapenos) tastes great on cream cheese covered crackers or burgers! It's easy to can them for long term storage.

The first time I heard of “cowboy candy”, I wasn’t sure that it was something I would enjoy. I like semi-spicy food, but didn’t know if I could handle candied jalapenos! Boy… was I wrong! It is definitely NOT too spicy at all, is actually sweet, and is a FABULOUS appetizer!

This recipe for cowboy candy is preserved for long term storage by canning it through a water bath process (only takes 15 minutes of cooking time).

How Much Cowboy Candy Does This Recipe Make?

The recipe as written below, makes 2 pints of this delectable treat, which comes out to about 64 Tablespoons of cowboy candy total!  One Tablespoon is a great topping for a cream cheese topped cracker, so you can see how a couple jars of cowboy candy will go far!

It is also very easy (and recommended) to double or triple this recipe, so you can have LOTS of jars of candied jalapenos in the pantry to serve as a quick fix appetizer! Guess what? Cowboy candy is also wonderful as a topping for grilled hamburgers or hot dogs! YUM!

So How Do I Make Cowboy Candy?

Prepare canning jars and water bath canner, according to USDA canning guidelines. Very basically, you will need to sterilize jars and flat lids, place a rack on the bottom of the canner (to keep jars off bottom), and bring the water in the canner to a simmer.

Thinly slice the jalapeno peppers. You “might” want to wear gloves for this part, but if you don’t, be sure to wash hands thoroughly after slicing, and do not rub your eyes… just sayin’.

Jalapeños are thinly sliced before adding them to the pan.

When I took these photos several years ago, I was ONLY making 2 pints, because it was my first time trying this particular recipe, and I wanted to make sure we liked the cowboy candy before making more.

Make The Sauce For The Cowboy Candy

In a large pan, bring the apple cider vinegar, sugar, mustard seed, garlic powder, turmeric, celery seed, and cayenne pepper to a boil, on medium heat.

Once the mixture begins boiling, turn the heat down to low, and simmer the syrup for 5 minutes.

A syrup is made to sweeten and season the candied jalapeños.

Add all of the sliced jalapenos into the syrup, and stir to combine. Continue to cook the cowboy candy on low heat for 5 more minutes.

Thinly sliced jalapeños are added to and cooked in the thick syrup to make cowboy candy

Now the jalapeños are ready to begin canning process for long term storage.

Canning Jars Of Cowboy Candy For Long Term Storage

Divide the cowboy candy into the hot, sterilized canning jars. To do this, add the jalapenos first, then add any remaining liquid from the pan. Fill the jars, being sure to leave 1/4″ headspace on each jar. Insert a plastic utensil a couple of times into each jar, to remove any air bubbles.

Wipe the jar rims with a moist towel or cloth to remove excess residue, add a prepared flat lid, and then add the screwband, tightening to fingertip tightness.

Place jars onto rack in canner and make sure there is enough simmering water to cover the top of each jar by 1-2 inches. Process the cowboy candy jars for 15 minutes, after the water comes to a gentle, rolling boil.

Jars are processed in a boiling water bath canner for 15 minutes.

Once you have finished canning the jars of cowboy candy, carefully remove each jar from the boiling water using canning tongs.

Place boiling hot jars onto a dish towel (placing them directly on counter could crack the jars due to temperature variances). Let the jars cool for at least 8 hours before disturbing them. Wipe jars clean, label them, test the seal to make sure the jars have sealed correctly, and store in pantry.

Here is a jar of cowboy candy after it has been canned for long term storage.

Serving Cowboy Candy As An Appetizer

If you want to serve these candied jalapenos as a wonderful appetizer or snack, simply spread some cream cheese (whipped or regular) onto a cracker, and top it with a Tablespoon of cowboy candy. Take a big bite, and enjoy!

The cowboy candy, served on top of a cream cheese covered cracker, is a great appetizer!

I really hope you will try this delicious recipe for cowboy candy!  It is SO GOOD when served as an appetizer (so easy, too), and is a delicious topping on a juicy hamburger or grilled hot dog! Have a wonderful day, and may God bless you as you journey through it!

Looking For Other Recipes For APPETIZERS?

You can find all of my appetizer AND canning recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. A few favorite appetizer recipes include:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!

There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:
Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram: jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Author's signature

Recipe Source: www.sbcanning.com/2010/10/cowboy-candy-check-this-out.html

Cowboy Candy (candied jalapenos)
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
15 mins
Total Time
35 mins
 

Cowboy Candy (also known as candied jalapenos) tastes great on cream cheese covered crackers or burgers! It's easy to can them for long term storage.

Category: Appetizer, Canning and Preserving
Cuisine: Southwest
Keyword: cowboy candy
Servings: 2 pints
Calories Per Serving: 30 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 1 pound fresh jalapeños , sliced thin
  • 2/3 cup apple cider vinegar
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 2 Tablespoons mustard seed
  • 1 Tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1/4 teaspoon turmeric
  • 1/4 teaspoon celery seed
  • 1/4 teaspoon cayenne pepper
Instructions
  1. Prepare canning jars and water bath canner, according to USDA canning guidelines. Very basically, you will need to sterilize jars and flat lids, place rack in canner, and bring the water in the canner to a simmer.

  2. Thinly slice the jalapeño peppers. You "might" want to wear gloves for this part, but if you don't, be sure to wash hands thoroughly after slicing, and do not rub your eyes... just sayin'.

  3. In a large pan, bring the apple cider vinegar, sugar, mustard seed, garlic powder, turmeric, celery seed, and cayenne pepper to a boil, on medium heat. Once the mixture begins boiling, turn the heat down to low, and simmer the syrup for 5 minutes. Add all of the sliced jalapeños into the syrup, and stir to combine. Continue to cook the cowboy candy on low heat for 5 more minutes.

  4. Divide the cowboy candy into the hot, sterilized canning jars. To do this, add the jalapeños first, then add any remaining liquid from the pan. Fill the jars, being sure to leave 1/4" headspace on each jar. Insert a plastic utensil a couple of times into each jar, to remove any air bubbles. Wipe rims clean, then add the prepared flat lid and screwband. Tighten screwband to fingertip tightness. Place jars onto rack in canner and make sure there is enough simmering water to cover the top of each jar by 1-2 inches. Process jars for 15 minutes, after the water comes to a gentle boil.  Once you have finished processing the jars, carefully remove each jar from the boiling water using canning tongs. Place hot jars onto a dish towel (placing them directly on counter could crack jars due to temperature variances). Let jars cool for at least 8 hours before disturbing them. Wipe jars clean, label, and test the seal to make sure the jars have sealed correctly, and then store in pantry. Enjoy!

Nutrition Facts
Cowboy Candy (candied jalapenos)
Amount Per Serving (1 Tablespoon)
Calories 30 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 1mg0%
Potassium 29mg1%
Carbohydrates 7g2%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 7g8%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 70IU1%
Vitamin C 10.2mg12%
Calcium 2mg0%
Iron 0.1mg1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Cowboy Candy (also known as candied jalapenos) tastes great on cream cheese covered crackers or burgers! It's easy to can them for long term storage.

How To Can Pears

Preserve summer’s fruit bounty for long term storage in the pantry by learning how to can pears (fresh and ripe) using a water bath canner!
Preserve summer's fruit bounty for long term storage in the pantry by learning how to can pears (fresh and ripe) using a water bath canner!

Do you know how to can pears?  It’s a great skill to learn, especially when you find yourself with a wonderful surplus of delicious home grown pears! Canning pears is a very economical way to stock up the pantry with jars of delicious ripe summer fruit, to enjoy year round!

Some of our neighbors recently blessed us with some fresh picked Anjou pears from their backyard pear tree. Wow. Free pears! Aren’t they gorgeous?

I received twice as many as shown in this photo, and made several spinach pear salads, dehydrated some pear slices, and canned several jars of pears for our pantry!

Fresh picked Anjou pears, ready to be canned for long term storage!

Several years ago, another friend blessed us with lots of Asian pears (much crisper than a traditional pear, like an apple), from their yard.  I used this same processing method to can those pears, as well.

Fresh Asian pears, ready to be canned for long term storage.

Asian Pears have been canned and are ready for the pantry!

In order to learn how to can pears, you will need to have a piece of equipment called a water bath canner, which is a very large covered pot, with an elevated rack inside to hold jars off the bottom of the pot. You will also need canning jars, with flat lids and screwbands.

You can purchase water bath canners, jars and lids online. Some grocery stores and department stores sell them, as well.

How To Can Pears

Prepare the pears by peeling. Cut the pears in half and remove the core. I like to use a small melon baller scoop to remove the core.

Pears are peeled and core is removed before canning.

Treat the pears with a product like Fruit Fresh to prevent browning. I use another option, typically, because I tend to not have any Fruit Fresh laying around.  I use this option on apples, as well.

Another Option To Prevent Pears From Browning

Another option (my preferred method) is to place the cored, halved pears into a large bowl of water and lots of salt (that has dissolved). I put about 1/4 cup salt into the water, and let it dissolve.

Once finished peeling and coring pears, add them to the water. This salty water bath will keep them from browning too much. When ready to place in jars, drain water and rinse pears very well, to remove salt. You won’t taste the salt, honest!

If canning peach halves, they will look like the photo below before rinsing.

Pears are treated before canning to ensure they stay light in color.

A light canning syrup is made with granulated sugar and water which is brought to a boil in a large pot, to dissolve the sugar.

Once pears (halves or slices) have been completely rinsed free of salt, they are placed into the warm syrup (single layer at a time) and heated through on low heat (about 5 minutes). The pears will need to be done in batches.

The photos below show both pear halves and pear slices in the light syrup (made with sugar and water). Preserving pears in a very light syrup helps preserve the fresh fruit flavor through the canning process, and long term storage.

Pear halves are heated in a light syrup before canning.

Peach slices are heated in light syrup before canning.

While the pears are being prepped, you will also want to be simmering the canning jars in water on a rack in the canner to get them prepared for the hot fruit. This is to prevent the jars from cracking once the hot fruit is added to them.

You will also need to prepare the jar flat lids and screwbands according to package instructions.

Glass jars are heating in water bath canner before pears are added to hot jars.

Remove hot jars from canner. Drain. Ladle the pear halves or slices into hot jars. Using a canning funnel will help this step to be less messy!

How To Place Pear Halves Or Slices In Jars

If using pear halves, layer them cavity side down into the jar, overlapping layers. If canning pear slices, pack them into jars. Leave about 1/2 an inch or so from the top of the jar.

Ladle the hot syrup into each jar. Using a canning funnel will help this be less messy! The pears need to be covered with syrup. Make sure to leave 1/2 inch headspace in each jar.

Pear slices are added to jars, along with light syrup.

Use a plastic utensil and slide it down into sides of each jar a couple times to remove trapped air bubbles.

If necessary, add or remove syrup, to ensure a 1/2 inch headspace.

Air bubbles are removed from can of pears by inserting plastic utensil into jar.

Wipe the rims of each jar with a wet cloth (or paper towel) to make sure there is no syrup of food residue on jar rim. This is done to ensure a good seal.

Place a hot flat lid on top, then screw on the screwband (jar ring) to fingertip tightness.

Carefully place the jars in a upright position on the rack in the water in canner. Jars should be completely covered with water (by at least an inch over top of jars).

Put lid on canner. Bring the water in canner to a gentle boil.

Jars of pears with lids are placed onto elevated rack in simmering water in canner.

How Long Do I Process The Jars In The Canner?

Process pint jars for 20 minutes AFTER it reaches a boil. Process quart jars for 25 minutes AFTER water comes to a gentle boil.

Learning how to can pears involves learning how to use a water bath canner to process jars.

Once the processing time is done, turn off heat. Remove the canner lid.  Wait for 5 minutes, then carefully (with canning tongs) remove the jars to a dish towel on the counter.

TIP: Do not place boiling hot jars directly on kitchen counter, as temperature variations on surface could cause hot jars to crack.

Once Done With The Canning Process

You should hear the jars make a “pinging” sound as they seal. Let the jars cool completely (8-10 hours), then check to ensure they have properly sealed. To check, press lightly in the center of each lid. There should be NO resistance.

If jars sealed properly, wipe the outside of jars (in case any sticky syrup leaked out during processing), label jars, and store in pantry. Normal canning guidelines suggest you remove the screw bands from the jars before storing in pantry. Do not stack jars on top of each other.

If any jars do not seal properly, refrigerate… and eat within a few days. Canned pears will last a year or longer in the pantry, if properly sealed and processed.

After processing, jars of canned pears cool on dish towel before labeling and storing.

I hope you will consider learning how to can pears with this easy recipe. It’s wonderful to have jars of this delicious fruit in the pantry year round!

Looking For Other Canning Recipes?

If you enjoy preserving food in this way, you might also be interested in some of my other canning recipes for Apple Butter, Bread and Butter Pickles, Chocolate Raspberry Sundae Sauce, Cilantro Lime Enchilada Sauce, or Sliced Peaches.

There are a a lot of canning recipes for jam listed in my Recipe Index (shown in the menu toolbar at the top of each blog post), including Boysenberry, Blackberry, Strawberry, Bing Cherry, Peach, Raspberry, Blueberry, Orange Marmalade, and more! Hope you will check them out!

Have a GREAT day! May you find beauty all around you today. Sometimes you may have to look a bit harder to find it… but it’s out there!

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

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Author's signature

Original Recipe Source: Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving, published by Jarden Corporation, copyright 2006 and 2012. Pages 142, 145.

How To Can Pears
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 
Preserve summer's fruit bounty for long term storage in the pantry by learning how to can pears (fresh and ripe) using a water bath canner!
Category: Canning and Preserving
Cuisine: American
Keyword: can pears
Servings: 8 pint jars (or 4 quart jars)
Calories Per Serving: 379 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 8-12 pounds ripe, but firm pears
For Light Syrup
  • cups sugar
  • cups water
Instructions
  1. Prepare water bath canner according to manufacturer instructions. You will need enough simmering water in canner to completely cover jars once placed on rack.

  2. You will also want to simmer the canning jars in water on rack in canner to prepare them for adding hot fruit. This will prevent jars from cracking once hot fruit is added. You also need to prepare the jar flat lids and screwbands according to package instructions.

Make Light Syrup:
  1. Bring granulated sugar and water to a boil on medium high heat until sugar has dissolved. Reduce heat to LOW, and keep syrup warm until ready to use. Do NOT let the syrup boil down.

Prepare Pears:
  1. Peel, core, and half or slice pears.  Treat with Fruit Fresh OR place in large bowl with 1/4 cup salt dissolved in 6 cups water. If using salt/water method, keep pears submerged until ready to drain, rinse and pack jars.

  2. Once pears (halves or slices) have been rinsed free of salt, place them into syrup mixture (single layer at a time). Heat pears through (about 5 minutes). This will need to be done in batches.

To Can Pears:
  1. Remove hot jars from canner. Drain. Ladle pears into hot jars, through a canning funnel. If using pear halves, layer them cavity side down into the jar, overlapping layers. If canning pear slices, pack them into jars. Leave about 1/2 an inch or so from the top of the jar. Ladle hot syrup into each jar. Using a canning funnel will help this be less messy! The pears need to be covered with syrup. Make sure to leave 1/2 inch headspace in each jar. Use a plastic utensil and slide it down into sides of each jar a couple times to remove trapped air bubbles. If necessary, add or remove syrup, to ensure a 1/2 inch headspace.

  2. Wipe the rims of each jar with a wet cloth (or paper towel) to make sure there is no syrup of food residue on jar rim. This is done to ensure a good seal. Place a hot flat lid on top, then screw on the screwband (jar ring) to fingertip tightness.  Carefully place the jars in a upright position on the rack in the water in canner. Jars should be completely covered with water (by at least an inch over top of jars). Put lid on canner. 

  3. Bring the water in canner to a boil. AFTER water reaches a gentle boil, process pint jars for 20 minutes. Process quart jars for 25 minutes. Once processing time is done, turn off heat. Remove canner lid. Wait 5 minutes, then carefully (with canning tongs) remove hot jars to a dish towel. TIP: Do not place boiling hot jars directly on kitchen counter, as temperature variations could cause jars to crack.

  4. You will hear the jars make a "pinging" sound as they seal. Let jars cool completely (8-10 hrs.), then check to ensure they have properly sealed. To check, press lightly in the center of each lid. There should be NO resistance. Wipe the outside of jars, label, and store in pantry. Remove screw bands from jars before storing in pantry. Do not stack jars on top of each other (this can cause lid to unseal). If any jars did not seal properly, refrigerate pears, and eat within a few days. Canned pears will last a year or longer in the pantry, if properly sealed.

Nutrition Facts
How To Can Pears
Amount Per Serving (1 pint jar of pears)
Calories 379
% Daily Value*
Sodium 4mg0%
Potassium 526mg15%
Carbohydrates 100g33%
Fiber 14g58%
Sugar 75g83%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 115IU2%
Vitamin C 19.5mg24%
Calcium 41mg4%
Iron 0.8mg4%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Preserve summer's fruit bounty for long term storage in the pantry by learning how to can pears (fresh and ripe) using a water bath canner!

 

Canning Sliced Peaches

It’s easy to save summer’s bounty by canning sliced peaches for long term storage! Simple and economical way to preserve fresh peaches to enjoy year round!
It's easy to save summer's bounty by canning sliced peaches for long term storage! Simple and economical way to preserve fresh peaches to enjoy year round!

It’s THAT time of the summer season when fresh peaches are at their peak, juicy and ready for the picking or buying!  I LOVE to pick peaches straight off the trees at local U-Pick farms, support local hard-working farmers, AND get fresh peaches to cook, can, and bake with! You might enjoy canning Peach Jam, too!

I’ve been able to use fresh picked peaches in several recipes on this blog, including peach turnovers, homemade ice cream, pies, old-fashioned crisp, canned salsa, jam, overnight oats, and tarts! I LOVE fresh juicy peaches… they are one of my favorite summer fruits!

Fresh picked peaches... ready for canning!

Once I learned about canning sliced peaches, I was hooked! I love being able to can peaches, put them in our pantry, and pull out a jar in the middle of a cold winter, and be taken back to “glorious Summertime” when I eat them!  The process of canning sliced peaches for long term storage is fairly easy… here’s how!

Canning Sliced Peaches – Prepare The Peaches

The first thing you will need to do is prepare the canning jars, lids, etc., AND peel the peaches. Of course, you can always peel them with a knife, but I’ve found a different way to do this easily (and do several peaches at a time)!

Place 3-4 peaches at a time into a large pot of boiling water. This helps to soften and loosen the peel. Only let the whole peaches stay in the boiling water for one minute, then remove.

Peaches placed in boiling water to help remove peels.

As soon as you remove the peaches from the boiling water, immediately place them in a large bowl of ice cold water (really cold). This will stop the “heating” process very quickly. Can you see how the skins are loosening from the peach in the photo below?

Peaches placed in ice water to help remove peel.

Remove peaches from ice water and you can easily pull the entire peeling off the peach, leaving a beautiful round peach, with no skin left on. Perfect. Repeat process with remaining peaches until done.

Peeled peaches, ready to be sliced for canning.

Remove seed from peaches, then slice. Place all peach slices into a large bowl. Treat peaches with Fruit Fresh or lemon juice to prevent browning.

Sliced fresh peaches, ready for canning!

Prepare The Canning Jars And Equipment

Prepare and sterilize canning jars. I like to place them in my water bath canner (on the elevated rack), and let them simmer (NOT boil) while I am preparing the peaches.

Have all your canning utensils, jar lids and rings prepared and ready to use, according to manufacturer instructions and standard USDA canning guidelines.

Jars in simmering water, being prepared for canning sliced peaches

Sterilized canning jars and funnel, ready to can peach slices!

Prepare the syrup for peaches, by combining sugar and water in stainless steel saucepan. Stir, and bring mixture to a boil, using medium high heat. Stir often until sugar dissolves. Turn heat to Low, and keep the syrup warm, until you are ready to fill canning jars, stirring occasionally.

Warm peach slices in large stainless steel pan (one single layer at a time) on medium-low heat. Cook ONLY until just heated through (about 1 minute), then repeat with remaining peaches. You CAN raw pack the peaches, but slightly heating them allows less air present in the jars (which can cause the fruit to “float” in the jar). Heating peaches is preferable.

Remove peaches with a slotted spoon; pack the warm peach slices into prepared canning jars using a canning funnel, being sure to leave 1/2 inch headspace in jar. Ladle warm syrup into jars, leaving 1/2 inch headspace.

Remove air bubbles from jars with canning utensil; adjust headspace, if necessary, by removing or adding warm syrup. I use canning utensils that only cost a little over $10 (no I am NOT an Amazon affiliate- just showing you what I use when canning sliced peaches, etc.). Wipe rims of jars clean (to help jars seal properly), place flat lids on jars, then screw the bands on to fingertip tightness.

Carefully lower the jars (on their rack) into simmering water in canner. Make sure the jars are covered completely with water (at least 1-2 inches over tops of jars).  Bring water to a boil. Process pint jars for 20 minutes, and quart jars for 25 minutes.

Canning jars of sliced peaches in a water bath canner.

Once jars have been processed and you are finished canning sliced peaches, turn off heat; remove canner lid. Wait 5 minutes, then carefully remove hot jars with canning tongs to a dish towel (don’t put the hot jars straight onto a counter top-this could cause jars to crack). Let jars cool (you should hear the jars “ping” as they seal) for 12 hours.

Jars of sliced peaches are canned, and ready for pantry!

Once the jars have sat, undisturbed, for 12-24 hours, check to make sure the jars have sealed correctly, then wipe down jars, label them, and store them in your pantry! I remove the screw bands for storing. Any jars that did not seal properly should be refrigerated and used within a week.

Canning sliced peaches for long term storage is simple and economical!

And that is how canning sliced peaches is done! It’s actually fairly easy, and it’s very convenient having jars of fresh summer peaches n our pantry year round! I sure hope you will try this recipe!

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:

Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest:
The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram:
jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Have a GREAT day!

Author's signature

Recipe Source: My beloved guidebook for canning, called “Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving- 400 Delicious and Creative Recipes For Today”, pages 150 and 142. Published by Jarden Corporation, 2006.

Canning Sliced Peaches
Prep Time
15 mins
Cook Time
25 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 
It's easy to save summer's bounty by canning sliced peaches for long term storage! Simple and economical way to preserve fresh peaches to enjoy year round!
Category: Canning and Preserving
Cuisine: American
Keyword: canning sliced peaches
Servings: 8 pints (or 4 quarts)
Calories Per Serving: 394 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 8-12 pounds peaches , halved, pitted, treated to prevent browning
To Make Light Syrup:
  • cups granulated sugar
  • cups water
Instructions
  1. The first thing you will need to do is prepare the canning jars, lids, etc., and peel the peaches. Remove seed from peaches, then slice. Place all peach slices into a large bowl. Treat peaches with Fruit Fresh or lemon juice to prevent browning.

  2. Prepare and sterilize canning jars. I like to place them in my water bath canner filled half way with water (on the elevated rack), and let them simmer (NOT boil) while I am preparing the peaches. Have all your canning utensils, jar lids and rings prepared and ready to use, according to manufacturer instructions and standard USDA canning guidelines.

  3. Prepare syrup for peaches, by combining sugar and water in stainless steel saucepan. Stir, and bring mixture to a boil, on medium high heat. Stir often until sugar dissolves. Turn heat to Low; keep syrup warm, stirring occasionally, until ready to fill canning jars, stirring.

  4. Warm peach slices in large stainless steel pan (one single layer at a time) on medium-low heat. Cook ONLY until just heated through (about 1 minute), then repeat with remaining peaches.  Remove peaches with a slotted spoon; pack  peach slices into hot, prepared canning jars, being sure to leave 1/2 inch headspace in jar. Ladle warm syrup into jars, leaving 1/2 inch headspace.

  5. Remove air bubbles from jars; adjust headspace, if necessary, by removing or adding syrup. Wipe rims of jars clean (to help jars seal properly), place flat lids on jars, then screw the bands on to fingertip tightness. Carefully lower jars (on rack) into simmering water in canner. Make sure the jars are covered completely with water (at least 1-2 inches over tops of jars). Cover. Bring water to a boil. Process pint jars for 20 minutes, and quart jars for 25 minutes.

  6. Once jars have been processed, turn off heat; remove canner lid. Wait 5 minutes, then carefully remove hot jars with canning tongs to a dish towel (don't put the hot jars straight onto a counter top-this could cause jars to crack). Let jars cool (you should hear the jars "ping" as they seal) for 12-24 hours.

  7. Once the jars have sat, undisturbed, for 12-24 hours, check to make sure the jars have sealed correctly, then wipe down jars, label them, and store them in your pantry! I  remove the screw bands for storing. Any jars that did not seal properly should be refrigerated, and used within a week. ENJOY!

Recipe Notes

TIP FOR REMOVING PEACH PEELS: Place 3-4 peaches at a time into a large pot of boiling water. This helps to loosen peel. Only let the whole peaches stay in boiling water for one minute, then remove. As soon as you remove the peaches from boiling water, immediately place them in a large bowl of ice cold water (really cold). This will stop the "heating" process quickly. Remove peaches from ice water and easily pull the entire peeling off the peach, leaving a beautiful round peach, with no skin. Repeat process with remaining peaches.

Nutrition Facts
Canning Sliced Peaches
Amount Per Serving (1 pint)
Calories 394 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Potassium 861mg25%
Carbohydrates 99g33%
Fiber 6g25%
Sugar 94g104%
Protein 4g8%
Vitamin A 1480IU30%
Vitamin C 29.9mg36%
Calcium 27mg3%
Iron 1.2mg7%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!It's easy to save summer's bounty by canning sliced peaches for long term storage! Simple and economical way to preserve fresh peaches to enjoy year round!

 

 

 

Boysenberry Jam

Homemade boysenberry jam is a delicious reminder of summer time at it’s BEST! Learn how to make this classic jam, and can it for long term storage!
Homemade boysenberry jam is a reminder of summer time at it's BEST! Learn how to make this classic jam, and can it for long term storage!

I love summers in Oregon!  Our temperatures climb higher than normal, and the local farms are filled with fresh fruit and vegetables!  I LOVE to go picking at local U-Pick farms, where you can easily pick 10-20 pounds of a variety of fresh berries, apples, pears, peaches, etc., for a fraction of the price you would pay for them at the grocery store!

I recently picked fresh boysenberries (my favorite berry). I went to the farm in the early morning, while it was still a bit cool, and spent just under an hour walking down a row bursting with fresh berries, and picked to my hearts content.

The U-Pick farm I go to each year has a policy that you can nibble for free while you pick, so I tasted several of these juicy beauties while I worked, and enjoyed them a LOT!

Look at the size of that fresh picked boysenberry!

Once I got home I froze some to use later in the year, ate a lot of fresh berries with breakfast, and made 10 jars of jam, which I will store in our pantry (and give away to family and friends).

One of our sons came over the next day and got a couple jars of boysenberry jam and  raspberry jam for his own home. It makes me happy to be able to give him some of my fresh homemade jam!

What Else Can You Make With Boysenberries?

I also love using boysenberries in my recipes for Boysenberry Shortbread Tart, Deep Dish Boysenberry Pie or regular, classic Boysenberry Pie! Boysenberry Cobbler is a favorite, too!

Fresh boysenberries on the vine-ready to be picked to make jam!

The process for making jam is really not too difficult, once you understand the basics. My hope is that this post will walk you through how to make this delicious boysenberry jam, from scratch. Once you are successful, you will be thrilled that you can stock your pantry with homemade jam for long term storage!

I’ll bet you will be ready to make other jams, too, once you’ve started! You might be interested in trying my other jam recipes for Peach, Bing Cherry, Homemade Blackberry, Orange Marmalade, Strawberry or Blueberry, to name a few.

How To Make Boysenberry Jam

Before beginning, make sure you have all the ingredients and equipment (canner, jars, lids, utensils, etc.) ready to go. Wash jars and lids in soapy hot water. Fill a water bath canner half full of water. Bring this to a low simmer.

Fill jars with water and put in canner on an elevated rack, while water is simmering, to keep jars warm (or you can set jars on dish towel on a cookie sheet and keep in oven at 250 degrees for 20 minutes for same effect).

At the same time, I start a teapot with water going, so I will have boiling water for the jar lids later on when needed.  Put flat jar lids in small bowl. In a large bowl, measure out the exact amount of sugar. Set aside.

Crush the berries one cup at a time (it is very easy if you use a potato masher).

NOTE: You will need a couple cups more fresh berries then you think, because you must measure out 6 cups of CRUSHED berries, so plan for that! Put the finely crushed berries (6 cups total) into a large stock pot.

Boysenberries are mashed then added to large pot to cook.

Stir the box of powdered fruit Pectin into the berries. Bring this mixture to a full rolling boil on high heat, stirring constantly (a rolling boil is when it is boiling hard, it won’t stop bubbling even when stirred). Once berries are at full rolling boil stage, stir in all of the sugar quickly (all at once). Stir well to combine.

At this point, I pour boiling water over the jar lids that are in the little separate bowl. Let them just sit in the hot water for 5 minutes while you finish the boysenberry jam.

Pectin is added to boysenberries; it is cooked then sugar is added to fruit.

Bring the jam/juice/pectin/sugar mixture back to a full, rolling boil. Once it is a full rolling boil, boil it for exactly 4 minutes, stirring constantly. When time is up, remove pan from heat, then skim off any accumulated foam (and discard foam).

Ladle the hot jam mixture into drained, hot, prepared jars. A wide mouth canning funnel makes this a lot less messy! Fill the jars, but leave 1/8 inch headspace at the top of each jar. Insert a plastic knife into each jar a couple times to help remove air bubbles.

Adjust the headspace if necessary. Use a damp cloth or paper towel to wipe down the rim and edges of the jar (you need it free of debris in order to get a good seal on the jar).

Jam ladled into jars, air removed, then rims wiped clean before canning.

Cover the jars with the hot, flat jar lid. I love my magnetic canning wand that lifts the flat lids out of the hot water easily! Screw on the jar rings tightly. Lower each of the jars onto an elevated rack in the canner.

The jars must be completely covered with water, and must have at least an inch of water over the top of the jar. Add more boiling water to canner, if necessary, to make sure.

Cover the canner; bring to a gentle boil. Once the water is boiling, process the jars for 10 minutes.

Jars are sealed then processed in water bath canner.

When done, wait for a couple minutes, then carefully remove canner lid (lift lid away from you because of steam); carefully lift each jar out of water (with canning tongs), and place on dish towel on the counter to cool.

Do not put jars directly on counter cause you don’t want temperature differences to possibly crack jars. You should hear “ping” sound as the jars of boysenberry jam seal properly.

After the jars cool off, you can check to see they sealed properly by pressing the middle of the lid. The jar should NOT spring back when touched. If it does spring back, then you will need to refrigerate that particular jar.

Let the sealed jars stand at room temp for 24 hours, then store unopened in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year. If any jars do NOT seal, store in refrigerator and use immediately.

Jars of jam cooling down on dish towel on counter.

Here is a close up of the boysenberry jam I made,  on a toasted English muffin (just waiting for me to gobble it up). Doesn’t it look yummy? Let me tell ya… it IS GOOD! All I needed with it was a good cup of hot coffee and a comfortable chair to sit in while I enjoyed them both!

Fresh homemade boysenberry jam on english muffins

Yummy boysenberry jam spread onto english muffins.

I really hope you enjoy this boysenberry jam!  I think it is my favorite jam of all time! I also hope that you will enjoy the process of making jam, and will be motivated to try other flavors, as well.

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:

Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest:
The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram:
jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Have a fantastic day!

Author's signature

Recipe Source: Recipe found inside box of MCP Premium Fruit Pectin

Boysenberry Jam
Prep Time
20 mins
Cook Time
10 mins
Total Time
30 mins
 
Homemade boysenberry jam is a delicious reminder of summer time at it's BEST! Learn how to make this classic jam, and can it for long term storage!
Category: Jam / Canning and Preserving
Cuisine: American
Keyword: boysenberry jam
Servings: 10 half-pint jars (or 5 pint jars)
Calories Per Serving: 44 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 6 cups crushed boysenberries
  • 2 ounces powdered fruit pectin , 1 box (some are 1.75 ounces)
  • cups granulated sugar
Instructions
  1. Before beginning, make sure you have all the ingredients and equipment (canner, jars, lids, utensils, etc.) ready to go. Wash jars and lids in soapy hot water. Fill a water canner half full of water. Bring this to a low simmer. Fill jars with water and put on an elevated rack in canner , while water is simmering, to keep jars warm. (Or you can set jars on dish towel on a cookie sheet and keep in oven at 250 degrees for 20 minutes for same effect). At the same time, I start a teapot with water going, (so I will have boiling water for the jar lids later on).  

  2. Put flat jar lids in small bowl and set aside. In a large bowl, measure out the exact amount of sugar needed. Set aside.

  3. Crush the berries one cup at a time (it is very easy if you use a potato masher). Put the finely crushed berries (6 cups total) into a large stock pot. Stir the box of Pectin into the berries. Bring this mixture to a full rolling boil on high heat, stirring constantly (a rolling boil is when it is boiling hard, it won't stop bubbling even when stirred). Once berries are at full rolling boil stage, stir in all of the sugar quickly (all at once). Stir well to combine.

  4. At this point, I pour boiling water over the jar lids that are in the little bowl. Let them just sit in the hot water for 5 minutes while you finish the jam.
  5. Bring the jam/juice/pectin/sugar mixture back to a full, rolling boil. Once it is a full rolling boil, boil it for exactly 4 minutes, stirring constantly. When time is up, remove pan from heat, then skim off any accumulated foam (and discard foam). Ladle the hot jam mixture into drained, hot, prepared jars. Fill the jars, but leave 1/8 inch headspace at the top of each jar. Insert a plastic knife into each jar a couple times to help remove air bubbles. Adjust the headspace if necessary. Use a damp cloth or paper towel to wipe down the rim and edges of the jar (you need it free of debris in order to get a good seal on the jar). Cover the jars with the hot, flat jar lid. Screw on the jar rings tightly. Lower each of the jars onto an elevated rack in the canner. The jars must be completely covered with water, and must have at least an inch of water over the top of the jar. Add more boiling water to canner, if necessary, to make sure.
  6. Cover the canner; bring to a gentle boil. Once the water is boiling, process the jars for 10 minutes. When done, wait for a couple minutes, then carefully remove canner lid (lift lid away from you because of steam); carefully lift each jar out of water (with canning tongs), and place on dish towel on the counter to cool (do not put jars directly on counter cause you don't want temperature differences to possibly crack jars). You should hear "ping" sound as the jars seal properly.
  7. After the jars cool off, you can check to see they sealed properly by pressing the middle of the lid. The jar should NOT spring back when touched. If it does spring back, then you will need to refrigerate that particular jar. Let the sealed jars stand at room temp for 24 hours, then store unopened in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year. If any jars do NOT seal, store in refrigerator and use immediately.
Recipe Notes

Plan ahead... The amount of berries needed is 6 cups CRUSHED berries. Make sure you have a couple cups of extra boysenberries before beginning, to ensure you have the correct amount necessary for this jam!

Nutrition Facts
Boysenberry Jam
Amount Per Serving (1 Tablespoon)
Calories 44
% Daily Value*
Potassium 6mg0%
Carbohydrates 11g4%
Sugar 10g11%
Vitamin A 5IU0%
Vitamin C 0.2mg0%
Calcium 1mg0%
Iron 0.1mg1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Homemade boysenberry jam is a delicious reminder of summer time at it's BEST! Learn how to make this classic jam, and can it for long term storage!

Homemade Blackberry Jam

Enjoy the taste of summer berries all year long by making homemade blackberry jam! Instructions included for canning this jam for long term storage.
Enjoy the taste of summer berries all year long by making homemade blackberry jam! Instructions included for canning this jam for long term storage.

Do you enjoy fresh blackberries when they are at their peak during the Summer season? We sure do! I LOVE fresh blackberries, and especially homemade blackberry jam!

We are blessed here in our “neck of the woods” in Oregon to have an abundance of fresh blackberries growing wild EVERYWHERE! You can you pick them at a local U-Pick farms, find them growing along the road, or (in our case), growing wild right along our back fence, or at the local elementary school!

What Else Can You Use Fresh Blackberries For?

These delicious berries can be used in a variety of yummy dishes, such as Blackberry Scones, Blackberry Soda, Blackberry Cobbler, or Blackberry Pie Bars! These delectable berries can also be used to make jars of scrumptious homemade blackberry jam!

Blackberries, ready for picking!

Two buckets of fresh picked blackberries- time to make JAM!

What Do I Need To Make Homemade Blackberry Jam?

The process for making blackberry jam is fairly simple, and requires only a few ingredients, the most important ingredient being fresh blackberries! This recipe requires 5¾ cups of fresh berries, which is is the equivalent of approximately 6 pint-sized baskets you can find at the grocery store. You will also need lemon juice, sugar, pectin. You will also need canning jars, lids, and a water bath canner.

This recipe also uses powdered pectin, which is a substance that is naturally found in some types of fruit. Pectin is sold in powdered or liquid form (usually in the baking section) at most grocery stores.

This jam recipe uses powdered fruit pectin.The recipe as written below yields a quantity of 5 pint jars of jam, or if you want smaller jars, 9-10 half-pints of homemade jam.

Fresh picked blackberries

Rinsing blackberries in a colander, before making jam

Canning Homemade Blackberry Jam

The process is fairly straightforward, and even if you have not canned jam before, I think you will be surprised how simple it actually is!

Cooking blackberries to make homemade jam

Blackberries are cooked with sugar, lemon juice and pectin. Warm, sterilized canning jars are then filled with the hot jam. Air is removed from the jars, the rims are wiped clean, and then flat lids are placed on top and screwed down.

Sterile canning jars and canning funnel ready to fill with blackberry jam

How Long Does It Take To Process The Jars Of Jam?

The canning jars full of jam are then placed on a raised rack, and processed in a boiling water bath canner for 10 minutes.

Jars of jam sit on a rack in water bath canner

Filled jars are processed in a water bath canner

Once the jam is finished processing, the hot jars are removed from canner and are transferred to a dish towel on the counter, where they sit and cool down/stabilize for several hours. The jars will make a “pinging” sound as each jar seals securely.

Homemade blackberry jam, processed in jars and ready to store in pantry

Once you know the jars of jam have sealed properly, the only thing left to do is wipe the jars clean, attach a label to identify the contents, and store jars in the pantry.

Time To Enjoy Some Jam!

Once you’re ready for some delicious, jam, simply open a jar, and spread a bit on toast, biscuits or English muffins. Take a huge bite…and enjoy this “little taste of Summer”!

Toast with blackberry jam on a plate

Had to try a bite of that toast and homemade blackberry jam!

I am confident you will LOVE this blackberry jam! I’ve made it many times. Once I learned “how” to can jam and jellies, it changed everything for me. I no longer have to buy jam at the grocery store, It’s also very convenient to have extra jars of homemade jam in my pantry to give a thoughtful, homemade gift to to family and friends (and they love receiving the jam, as well!).

This girl (me, myself and I) sincerely hopes you will consider making your very own homemade jam! It sure is nice to can jars of it to stock up the ol’ family cupboards! YUM!

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Recipe Source: Instructions found inside a box of MCP Premium Fruit Pectin

Homemade Blackberry Jam
Prep Time
30 mins
Cook Time
10 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 
Enjoy the taste of summer berries all year long by making homemade blackberry jam! Instructions included for canning this jam for long term storage.
Category: Jam / Canning and Preserving
Cuisine: American
Keyword: blackberry jam
Servings: 10 cups (5 pint or 10 half-pint jars)
Calories Per Serving: 47 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • cups fresh blackberries (approx. 6 pint-sized baskets)
  • 1/4 cup fresh lemon juice
  • 2 ounces powdered Fruit Pectin ( 1 box)
  • 8 cups sugar
Instructions
  1. Before beginning, make sure you have all the ingredients and equipment (canner, jars, lids, utensils, etc.) ready to go. Wash jars and lids in soapy hot water. Fill a water canner half full of water. Bring this to a low simmer. Fill jars with water and put on an elevated rack in canner , while water is simmering, to keep jars warm. (Or you can set jars on dish towel on a cookie sheet and keep in oven at 250 degrees for 20 minutes for same effect). At the same time, I start a teapot with water going, (so I will have boiling water for the jar lids later on).

  2. Put flat jar lids in small bowl and set aside. In a large bowl, measure out the exact amount of sugar needed. Set aside.
  3. Crush the berries one cup at a time (it is very easy if you use a potato masher). Put the finely crushed berries (5¾ cups total) into a large stock pot. Add lemon juice. Stir the box of Pectin into the berries. Bring this mixture to a full rolling boil on high heat, stirring constantly (a rolling boil is when it is boiling hard, it won't stop bubbling even when stirred). Once berries are at full rolling boil stage, stir in all of the sugar quickly (all at once). Stir well to combine.

  4. At this point, I pour boiling water over the jar lids that are in the small bowl. Let them just sit in the hot water for 5 minutes while you finish the jam.

  5. Bring the jam/juice/pectin/sugar mixture back to a full, rolling boil. Once it is a full rolling boil, boil it for exactly 4 minutes, stirring constantly. When time is up, remove pan from heat, then skim off any accumulated foam (and discard foam). Ladle the hot jam mixture into drained, hot, prepared jars. Fill the jars, but leave 1/8 inch headspace at the top of each jar. Insert a plastic knife into each jar a couple times to help remove air bubbles. Adjust the headspace if necessary. Use a damp cloth or paper towel to wipe down the rim and edges of the jar (you need it free of debris in order to get a good seal on the jar). Cover the jars with the hot, flat jar lid. Screw on the jar rings tightly. Lower each of the jars onto an elevated rack in the canner. The jars must be completely covered with water, and must have at least an inch of water over the top of the jar. Add more boiling water to canner, if necessary, to make sure.

  6. Cover the canner; bring to a gentle boil. Once the water is boiling, process the jars for 10 minutes. When done, wait for a couple minutes, then carefully remove canner lid (lift lid away from you because of steam); carefully lift each jar out of water (with canning tongs), and place on dish towel on the counter to cool (do not put jars directly on counter cause you don't want temperature differences to possibly crack jars). You should hear "ping" sound as the jars seal properly.
  7. After the jars cool off, you can check to see they sealed properly by pressing the middle of the lid. The jar should NOT spring back when touched. If it does spring back, then you will need to refrigerate that particular jar. Let the sealed jars stand at room temp for 24 hours, then store unopened in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year. If any jars do NOT seal, store in refrigerator and use immediately.
Nutrition Facts
Homemade Blackberry Jam
Amount Per Serving (1 Tablespoon)
Calories 47
% Daily Value*
Potassium 29mg1%
Carbohydrates 12g4%
Sugar 10g11%
Vitamin A 40IU1%
Vitamin C 3.9mg5%
Calcium 5mg1%
Iron 0.1mg1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Enjoy the taste of summer berries all year long by making homemade blackberry jam! Instructions included for canning this jam for long term storage.