Category: Canning And Preserving

How To Can Green Beans

Overrun with fresh garden green beans this summer? Learn how to can green beans for long term storage, to enjoy all year long!Overrun with fresh garden green beans this summer? Learn how to can green beans for long term storage, to enjoy all year long!
One summer several years ago I was “overrun” with green beans growing in my backyard raised bed garden. I KNEW I wanted to learn how to can green beans to preserve them, so I used a birthday gift card I received and bought a pressure canner. The rest is history!

That was several summers ago, and I’ve now learned and progressed in my pressure canning  (and water bath canning), to where I am now canning lots of veggies, beans, soups, jams, and stews… AND I LOVE IT! Do you know how to can green beans? It’s actually quite easy, once ya get the basics down.

There’s something wonderful about pulling a jar of homegrown green beans (or other foods) right out of our pantry that makes me smile!  And the fact that I’ve never had a “bad” unsealed or cracked jar tells me I must be doing it right! So if you’re interested in learning how to can green beans here’s the “how to”.

Scroll Down For A Printable Recipe Card At The Bottom Of The Page

How To Can Green Beans

First thing is very important: always refer to your pressure canner’s manufacturer’s instructions for your specific canner before beginning.  Note: Green beans must be canned using a PRESSURE canner. Vegetables and meats, soups, etc. must be pressure-canned, due to low acidity present in those foods. Unfortunately they CANNOT be processed in a water bath canner (not enough heat to kill off any potentially harmful bacteria!). This is the first thing I had to understand when it was time to learn how to can green beans!

Start with fresh beans (for this batch I combined green and yellow fillet beans from our garden). Rinse beans, and then drain them.

Trim the ends off the beans, then snap or cut them into 2 inch pieces. (I enjoy “snapping” beans while I watch TV).  Typically I pack beans tightly into jars before canning to get an estimate of how many jars I will need. Once that’s done, I remove beans,  re-wash jars, then proceed with the canning process. Set the beans aside until you’re ready to pack them into hot jars.

Fresh picked green (and yellow) beans ready to can, for long term storage!

Prepare The Canning Jars And Flat Lids

Wash the canning jars, then place them upside down on a dish towel-lined baking sheet.  Place them in a preheated 200 degree oven for about 20-25 minutes.

Some people put them in simmering water to heat, but I like the convenience of having my stove top free while I am heating the water up in my pressure canner and heating boiling water to add to the filled jars.

Canning jars being prepared for canning green beans.

While the jars are in the oven heating, prepare pressure canner, jars and lids according to manufacturer instructions. Bring a kettle of water to a low boil. About 5 minutes before the jars are finished heating and the beans are ready to be added, pour some of the very hot water over the flat jar lids (and let them sit in the water in a bowl for 5 minutes – this softens the rubber seal).

Pack The Green Beans Into Hot Jars

I usually “raw pack” the beans (one of TWO canning methods), which means to tightly pack the raw green beans in the heated jars. Fill the jars to within one inch of the top of jar.

Place 1/2 teaspoon canning salt into each jar. Pour boiling water (I use a canning funnel) into each jar, leaving 1 inch headspace. (See NOTES section of the printable recipe below for alternate method).

Green beans and canning salt are placed into prepared hot canning jars

Remove air bubbles from jar; adjust the headspace by adding or removing liquid to ensure you have the correct 1 inch headspace. Use a paper towel and wipe the rim of each jar dry/clean, to help ensure a good seal. Place the heated flat lid on jar, then add screw band and tighten to fingertip tightness.

Processing The Jars Of Green Beans

Carefully place the jars into simmering water in the pressure canner, lock the canner lid in place, then turn the stove top to medium high heat. As the water inside comes to a boil, steam will escape through the vent. Let the steam vent for 10 minutes, then place vent cover on to close vent.

Filled jars are placed onto rack in simmering water in pressure canner

Continue heating until the pressure canner reaches 10 pounds pressure. Maintain this pressure throughout the cooking time indicated. (Pint jars = process for 20 minutes, Quart jars = process for 25 minutes).

Pressure canner is sealed and temperature raised to 10 pounds pressure.

Once Canning Processing Time Is Completed

When processing time is completed, turn off the heat. Let the pressure of the canner drop down to zero naturally. Once the pressure returns to zero, wait a couple more minutes, then carefully remove the vent cover only. Wait another minute, then carefully remove canner lid. Let the jars sit in the canner for 10 more minutes, then remove them, using canning tongs.

Place the HOT jars onto a dish towel on the counter (DO NOT place directly on counter… temperature variations could make the jars crack!). Here’s a picture from another batch of jars using only GREEN beans. At this point you’ve conquered learning how to can green beans. Yay for YOU!

Cans of green beans are placed on dish towel to cool down after being removed from canner.Let The Jars Cool

Let the jars cool completely (for 12-24 hours) without disturbing, then check to make sure they sealed properly, label and store. Smile… and enjoy the reward from your small amount of work… a pantry full of green beans!

I LOVE that I can preserve beans from our garden each year and pull a jar of home-grown green beans off a pantry shelf any time I want… (haven’t bought beans in years!).

Sealed jars of green beans are labeled before storing in pantry.

For me personally, it is very rewarding to see jars of homegrown vegetables (and soups, stews, jam, etc) line our pantry shelves… it feels awesome! I am so glad I learned to pressure can and have enjoyed the results produced ever since!  And just think… it all started with learning how to can green beans!

Looking For More CANNING Recipes?

You can find all of my recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. I have quite a few canning recipes you might enjoy, including:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:
Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
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Author's signature

Recipe Source:  Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving, Published 2012, Robert Rose, Inc., Jarden Corporation, page 386 (and part of page 385)

0 from 0 votes
How To Can Green Beans
Prep Time
25 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Total Time
45 mins
 
Overrun with fresh garden green beans this summer? Learn how to can green beans for long term storage, to enjoy all year long!
Category: Canning
Cuisine: American
Keyword: green beans
Servings: 4 pint jars
Calories Per Serving: 140 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 4 pounds Green beans (approx. 1½ - 2½ pounds of beans per QUART jar)
  • 2 teaspoons Canning salt
  • 4 Pint Canning jars and lids/screwbands
  • Boiling water
Instructions
  1. Wash beans, then drain. Trim ends off beans, then snap or cut beans into 2 inch pieces.
  2. Wash canning jars, then place upside down on a dish towel-lined baking sheet. Place in a preheated 200 degree oven for 20-25 minutes. While jars are heating, prepare pressure canner, jars and lids according to manufacturer instructions. Bring a kettle of water to a low boil. About 5 minutes before the jars are finished heating and the beans are ready to be added, pour some of the very hot water over the flat jar lids (and let them sit in the water in a bowl for 5 minutes).
  3. Tightly pack the raw green beans in the heated jars. Fill the jars to within one inch of the top of jar. Place 1/2 teaspoon canning salt into each jar. Pour boiling water (use a canning funnel) into each jar, leaving 1 inch headspace. Remove air bubbles from jar; adjust headspace by adding or removing liquid to ensure you have a 1 inch headspace. Use a paper towel and wipe the rim of each jar dry/clean. Place the heated flat lid on jar, then add screwband and tighten to fingertip tight. Carefully place jars into simmering water in pressure canner, lock lid in place, then turn burner to medium high heat. As water inside comes to a boil, steam will escape through vent. Let the steam vent for 10 minutes, then place vent cover on to close vent.
  4. Continue heating until pressure canner reaches 10 pounds pressure. Maintain this pressure throughout the cooking time indicated. (Pint jars = process for 20 minutes, Quart jars = process for 25 minutes). Begin processing time once canner reaches 10 pounds pressure.
  5. When processing time is completed, turn off heat. Let the pressure drop to zero naturally. Once the pressure returns to zero, wait a couple more minutes, then carefully remove vent cover. Wait another minute, then carefully unlock and remove canner lid. Let the jars sit in canner for 10 minutes, then remove, using canning tongs. Place HOT jars onto a dish towel on counter (DO NOT place directly on counter... temperature variations could make jars crack!). Let jars cool completely (for 12-24 hours) without disturbing, check for proper seal, label and store.
Recipe Notes

Quantity will vary, based on how many beans you process.
Processing: 10# pressure. Pints=20 minutes, Quarts=25 minutes.

Alternate method: Hot Pack method: Cut beans combined with boiling water to cover. Bring liquid to boil (medium-high heat). Boil beans for 5 minutes. Drain (but reserve liquid for adding to jars, if desired). Put hot beans into jars; cover with boiling water or reserved liquid. Continue with rest of directions, as written.

Nutrition Facts
How To Can Green Beans
Amount Per Serving (1 pint jar of beans)
Calories 140
% Daily Value*
Sodium 1189mg52%
Potassium 957mg27%
Carbohydrates 31g10%
Fiber 12g50%
Sugar 14g16%
Protein 8g16%
Vitamin A 3130IU63%
Vitamin C 55.4mg67%
Calcium 168mg17%
Iron 4.7mg26%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Overrun with fresh garden green beans this summer? Learn how to can green beans for long term storage, to enjoy all year long!

 

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How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables

Learn how to can beef stew, with beans, potatoes, carrots, etc. for long term storage, using a pressure canner. Enjoy this hearty stew year round! Learn how to can beef stew, with beans, potatoes, carrots, etc. for long term storage, using a pressure canner. Enjoy this hearty stew year round! It’s the middle of Summer, yet I find myself mentally preparing for the Oregon Fall and Winter ahead. I decided to get a jump on the cold, rainy weather and get some canned goods ready. Here’s how to can beef stew with vegetables…jars of yummy stew… now in our pantry!

I only wanted to can a small batch of beef stew, so I cut the original recipe in my Ball Canning book in half, but added canned tomatoes, canned green beans, minced garlic, dried oregano and beef bouillon to the recipe, which added additional vegetables and flavor. If you have the ability to process large quantities of jars, then by all means… double the recipe (below)! I have a smaller sized pressure canner, so the half recipe works well for my purposes!

If you love Beef Stew, but don’t enjoy canning, I would recommend checking out the Classic Beef Stew recipe on my blog, where the stew is BAKED slowly, and comes out thick, tender, and delicious! Check it out… it’s fabulous (and your home will smell so good!)!

Scroll Down For A Printable Recipe Card At The Bottom Of The Page

How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables

The stew MUST be canned in a pressure canner, but the preparation to can beef stew is fairly easy!  While you are preparing your pressure canner, jars and lids (according to manufacturer and USDA guidelines), begin by browning beef cubes in one Tablespoon of hot oil. You may need to brown the beef in batches, depending on the quantity of stew you are preparing.

Browning stew meat in large sauce pan.

Place browned beef into a large stainless steel pot. Add potatoes, carrots, onions, diced canned tomatoes, celery, garlic, and spices.  Stir to combine.

Potatoes, carrots, tomatoes are added to beef stew meat in pan.

Add 1 large beef bouillon cube to water (crumble it in with your fingers). Add one can green beans.  Add boiling water to completely cover meat and vegetables.  Stir to combine. Bring mixture to a boil, while stirring frequently.

Water, green beans and bouillon added to beef stew in pan.

Filling the Jars

Ladle the prepared stew into hot canning jars. Leave 1 inch headspace per jar. Remove air bubbles from jars. If needed, adjust the headspace in each jar, by adding or removing stew. Carefully wipe each rim with moistened paper towel to remove any moisture or grease, to ensure a good seal. Place hot flat lid onto each jar, add, then tighten down screw band to fingertip tightness.

Beef stew is ladled into canning jars, then sealed before canning.

Processing The Jars of Beef Stew

Place hot jars into water in pressure canner (prepared per manufacturer guidelines). Lock the lid, and turn up the heat to medium-high. Once it is boiling, let the steam vent from canner for 10 minutes, then close vent.

Continue heating until you reach 10 pounds pressure. Pint jars are processed for 75 minutes, and Quart jars for 90 minutes.

Can beef stew at 10# pounds pressure in pressure canner.

When processing time is completed, turn off heat.  Let the pressure in canner return to zero naturally. Once pressure returns to zero, wait a couple minutes, then carefully remove the vent cover. Wait a minute or so, then carefully remove the canner lid.

Wait 10 more minutes, then remove hot jars to a dish towel on the counter. Do not place boiling hot jars directly on counter- they might crack from temperature variance!  Let jars cool completely, check for proper seal, label, then store in pantry.

Canned beef stew on counter after processing.

As you can see, I had a very busy day canning, but it felt good to can beef stew, Split Pea and Ham Soup, and a few jars of Rhubarb-Orange Marmalade (from our garden rhubarb) and put them into our pantry!  It will be great to have these ready to go on those rainy Oregon days I KNOW will be here sooner, rather than later!

Thank you for stopping by, and I hope you will come back soon. Be sure and check out ALL my recipes in the recipe Index, which is located at the top of the page. Have a great day.

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:
Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram: jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Author's signature

Recipe Adapted From: The book called “Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving”, Published 2012, Robert Rose, Inc., page 407.

5 from 1 vote
How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables
Prep Time
30 mins
Cook Time
1 hr 30 mins
Total Time
2 hrs
 
Learn how to can beef stew, with beans, potatoes, carrots, etc. for long term storage, using a pressure canner. Enjoy this hearty stew year round!
Category: Canning and Preserving, Soup
Cuisine: American
Keyword: can beef stew
Servings: 5 Quarts (20 one cup servings)
Calories Per Serving: 31 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 1 Tablespoon vegetable oil
  • pounds stewing beef , cut into 1½ inch cubes
  • 6 cups potatoes , peeled and cubed
  • 4 cups carrots , peeled and sliced
  • cups chopped celery
  • cups chopped onions
  • 2 cans (11.5 ounce each) diced tomatoes
  • 1 can green beans (11.5 ounce)
  • 1 beef bouillon cube (large)
  • teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried thyme
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
  • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon minced garlic
  • Boiling water (enough to cover)
Instructions
  1. Prepare pressure canner, canning jars and lids, according to manufacturer instructions and general canning guidelines.
  2. Heat oil in large skillet (or very large saucepan) on medium-high. Brown the beef cubes (work in batches, if necessary). Only add additional oil if absolutely necessary.
  3. Place the browned beef into a very large saucepan; add potatoes, celery, carrots, onions, canned tomatoes, green beans, beef bouillon cube, and remaining spices. Stir to combine. Add boiling water to completely cover the ingredients. Bring the stew to a boil, while continuing to stir.
  4. Ladle the hot stew into hot canning jars. Be sure to leave a 1 inch headspace. Remove the air bubbles from each jar, then adjust the headspace by adding or removing stew, as necessary. Wipe the rims of each jar very well with a wet paper towel, to remove any trace of food or liquid. Place a heated flat lid on top, then screw the band down until it is fingertip tight.
  5. Carefully place the jars into prepared pressure canner. Lock the lid, then turn heat to medium high heat. Once it boils, vent the steam for 10 minutes, then close the vent. Continue to heat until canner reaches 10 pounds pressure. Process Quart jars for 90 minutes (If using pint jars, they need to be processed for 75 minutes).
  6. Once processing is completed, turn the heat off. Let the pressure return to zero naturally. Wait a few more minutes after if reaches zero, then open the vent cover. Remove the canner lid carefully (away from you). Let sit uncovered for 10 minutes, then carefully remove boiling hot jars to a dish towel. (Don't place boiling hot jars directly on counter as they might crack from temperature variance). Let jars cool completely, label and store in pantry.
Recipe Notes

Pint jars = 1 inch headspace. 75 minutes at 10# pressure = 10 jars
Quart jars = 1 inch headspace. 90 minutes at 10# pressure = 5 jars

Nutrition Facts
How To Can Beef Stew With Vegetables
Amount Per Serving (1 cup)
Calories 31 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Cholesterol 1mg0%
Sodium 422mg18%
Potassium 196mg6%
Carbohydrates 6g2%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 3g3%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 4359IU87%
Vitamin C 7mg8%
Calcium 28mg3%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Learn how to can beef stew, with beans, potatoes, carrots, etc. for long term storage, using a pressure canner. Enjoy this hearty stew year round!

 

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Split Pea and Ham Soup (and how to can it)

Make this filling, delicious Split Pea and Ham Soup on a cold day to warm you up! Recipe also includes tutorial for canning this soup for long term storage!Make this filling, delicious Split Pea and Ham Soup on a cold day to warm you up! Recipe also includes tutorial for canning this soup for long term storage!
Last week I decided to can some Split Pea and Ham Soup to store in our pantry for the cold Fall and Winter months ahead. It’s always satisfying to pull out a homemade “bone-warming” hearty soup out of our pantry when it’s cold and stormy outside!

Guess what?  Even if you don’t can jars of food, this is a delicious, easy, and economical soup to prepare for your family! This recipe makes a big pot of split pea and ham soup.

Scroll Down For A Printable Recipe Card At the Bottom Of The Page

How To Make Split Pea And Ham Soup

Combine 2 cups of split peas (a one pound bag) with water in a large soup pot. I used water PLUS added 2 large chicken bouillon cubes for flavor. Cook the split peas on medium-low for about an hour, just until they become tender.

Dried split peas are cooked until tender for split pea and ham soup.

Puree The Cooked Split Peas

Use an immersion blender to completely blend the peas until smooth. I puréed the peas until smooth, but it’s okay to leave them a bit chunky, if that’s how you enjoy them. NOTE: You can also process the peas and liquid in a food processor or blender. If using these appliances, work in batches, a little at a time, until puréed.

Cooked split peas and water are blended until smooth to make split pea and ham soup.

Make The Split Pea And Ham Soup

Add the carrots, ham, onion, bay leaf, and allspice to the puréed pea mixture in soup pot.

Chopped carrots, ham, onion and spices are ready to add to the split pea and ham soup.
Bring the split pea and ham soup to a boil using medium-high heat. Once the soup is boiling, reduce heat to low. Cook the soup on reduced heat for about 30 minutes. If the soup gets too thick, you can add a little bit more boiling water.

Once fully cooked, the split pea and ham soup will be ready to eat (if NOT canning).

Split pea and ham soup is cooked for 30 minutes in large soup pot.

How To Can Split Pea And Ham Soup

If canning, while soup is cooking, prepare pressure canner, canning jars and flat lids per manufacturer instructions (for cleaning, heating, etc.). Typically I put clean canning jars on a dish towel lined baking sheet. Let the jars heat in a 225 degree oven for about 20 minutes before filling.

Canning jars and funnel are ready to fill with split pea and ham soup before processing.

Ladle the hot split pea and ham soup into prepared hot jars.  Leave 1 inch headspace in each jar. The soup will thicken during the canning process, by the way!

Remove air bubbles from each jar, and make sure you have the correct headspace. Adjust the headspace, if necessary, by removing or adding liquid. Wipe rims of each jar clean with a wet paper towel to ensure a proper seal. Place a prepared flat lid on each jar, then tighten the screw band on, to fingertip tightness.

Canning jars are filled with split pea and ham soup for processing.

Carefully place the prepared jars of soup into the prepared pressure canner using canning tongs. Lock the lid, and process, according to manufacturer and USDA instructions for YOUR specific pressure canner. Example: Bring to boil, vent steam for 10 minutes, close vent, etc..

How Long To Process The Split Pea and Ham Soup In Pressure Canner

Process jars of soup at 10 pounds pressure. Pint jars are processed for 75 minutes and Quart jars are processed for 90 minutes.

Split pea and ham soup jars are finished processing and are lifted out of canner with tongs.

When processing time is done, turn the heat off. Let the pressure in your canner drop to zero on it’s own. Wait a couple additional minutes, then open vent. Let canner sit for an additional 10 minutes once vent is open. Carefully remove lid, then remove jars, using canning tongs.

Place the hot jars of split pea and ham soup onto a dish towel. Do NOT set jars directly onto kitchen counter, because the extremely hot jars could crack, because of temperature variations. Let the hot jars cool undisturbed, for 24 hours, then label the jars of soup, and store in your pantry.

Jars of canned split pea and ham soup are cooled, labeled and stored.

This recipe (from one of myBall canning books), makes 5 pint sized jars or 2 quart sized jars of split pea and ham soup. I made 5 pint jars this time, and now they are happily shelved in our pantry for a “rainy” day!

Canned split pea and ham soup tends to thicken quite a bit during the processing. When you open a jar, simply add a little bit of hot water to the soup. Heat soup until hot, and serve! It’s delicious!

A jar of canned split pea and ham soup is ready to store in the pantry!

It’s very fulfilling to prepare canned foods to stock our pantry with foods like this split pea and ham soup! I hope you enjoy the canning process, as well as this wonderful tasting soup!  Have a great day!

Looking For Other Canning Recipes On This Blog?

You can find my canning recipes in the Recipe Index in the top Menu Bar at the top of each blog post. Some of my canning recipes include:

I have many more canning recipes, including lots of Jam recipes, too! Hope you will check them out in my Recipe Index!

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:

Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest:
The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram:
jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Author's signature

Recipe Source: My book called “Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving”, Published 2012, Robert Rose, Inc., page 403.

5 from 2 votes
Split Pea and Ham Soup (and how to can it)
Prep Time
1 hr 30 mins
Cook Time
1 hr 15 mins
Total Time
2 hrs 45 mins
 
Make this filling, delicious Split Pea and Ham Soup on a cold day to warm you up! Recipe also includes tutorial for canning this soup for long term storage!
Category: Soup
Cuisine: American
Keyword: split pea and ham soup
Servings: 10 cups (5 pints)
Calories Per Serving: 163 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 2 cups dried split peas
  • 8 cups water
  • 2 large chicken bouillon cubes (optional, but adds additional flavor to broth)
  • 1 cup diced ham
  • 1 ½ cups sliced carrots
  • 1 cup chopped onion
  • ¼ teaspoon ground allspice
  • 1 bay leaf
  • Salt and Pepper , to taste
Instructions
  1. Place split peas, water and chicken bouillon cubes into a large saucepan or soup pot (stainless steel is best). Bring the ingredients to a boil with medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Once they come to a boil, turn down the heat to a low simmer; let the peas continue to cook for about an hour (or until the split peas become tender).
  2. When peas are done, purée peas and liquid, using a stick immersion blender OR processing in batches using a food processor. If using food processor, return purée to pan.
  3. Prepare pressure canner, jars, lids, etc. per manufacturer guidelines.
  4. Add ham, carrots, onion, allspice and bay leaf to soup. Bring soup to a boil. Reduce heat to low and cook for 30 minutes. Season soup with salt and pepper, to taste. If soup is a bit too thick, you can thin it out a little by adding a bit of boiling water to pan. Stir to combine. Remove bay leaf.
  5. Place hot, prepared jars on a dish towel. Ladle the soup mixture into jars, being sure to leave 1 inch headspace on each jar. Remove or add liquid, as necessary, to ensure correct headspace. Remove air bubbles from jars, then wipe the rim of jars clean using a wet paper towel, to ensure a good seal. Place hot flat lids on jar, then screw the bands into place until they are fingertip tight.
  6. Carefully put the jars into water in prepared pressure canner. Lock lid; turn heat to medium-high. Once vent begins steaming, let it vent for 10 minutes, then close vent. Heat until canner reaches 10 pounds pressure. After it reaches 10 pounds pressure, process PINTS for 75 minutes and QUARTS for 90 minutes.
  7. When done, turn off heat. Let the pressure in the canner drop to zero naturally. Once it gets to zero, wait a couple more minutes, then open the vent cover. Wait another 10 minutes, then carefully remove the canner lid. Place the hot jars on a dish towel on counter, and let them sit undisturbed for 24 hours. Check for proper seal, then label and store jars in pantry.
Recipe Notes

If using quart sized jars, this recipe will make 2 quarts (plus a bit more). The recipe is easily doubled.
When you open a can, you will notice that the soup will have thickened slightly during the canning process. Just add a bit of water to soup, reheat and enjoy!

Nutrition Facts
Split Pea and Ham Soup (and how to can it)
Amount Per Serving (1 cup)
Calories 163 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Cholesterol 6mg2%
Sodium 359mg16%
Potassium 471mg13%
Carbohydrates 27g9%
Fiber 10g42%
Sugar 5g6%
Protein 12g24%
Vitamin A 3265IU65%
Vitamin C 3.1mg4%
Calcium 33mg3%
Iron 1.9mg11%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Make this filling, delicious Split Pea and Ham Soup on a cold day to warm you up! Recipe also includes tutorial for canning this soup for long term storage!

 

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Beef Jerky DIY!

Make your own delicious beef jerky in a food dehydrator or oven at home, for a fraction of the cost of purchasing it!Make your own delicious beef jerky in a food dehydrator or oven at home, for a fraction of the cost of purchasing it!
Have you ever wondered HOW to make really great tasting beef jerky for a fraction of the price of store bought?  Well, if you like to snack on this chewy treat and want to know how to make your own in a food dehydrator OR in your oven, read on!

Over 20 years ago I bought a food dehydrator (see photo below) for about $25. I have used that thing a LOT ever since. It is a real “workhorse”, and I have used it for making my own beef jerky (as well as many varieties of dried fruits, spices, veggies, etc.) ever since!

That original $25 I spent was a great investment. (The photo below is to show you my little 5 rack machine – drying mint leaves and cherry tomatoes from our garden). I’ve also dehydrated lots of fruits and veggies, too!

Food dehydrator with herbs inside

Scroll Down For A Printable Recipe Card At the Bottom Of the Page

How To Make Beef Jerky

Making beef jerky is very easy, actually. Very thin strips of beef are marinated overnight (or a minimum of 4 hours), then placed in the dehydrator or oven and “dried” until the strips of meat are moisture free and pliable.

Here’s how you make beef jerky (with only 4 ingredients!)  The basic mix is 3 parts soy sauce, 1 part brown sugar, and 1 part Liquid Smoke (the picture shows what kind I use – found at grocery store).  Mix it up in a medium bowl.

Photo of bottle of concentrated Liquid Smoke flavoring

The meat (I like to use London broil or flank steak) is sliced into very thin 1/8″ strips (it is easiest to cut if meat is partially thawed after being frozen).  If you are using London Broil, cut slices WITH THE GRAIN.

If you will be using Flank Steak, cut slices AGAINST THE GRAIN. Beef jerky meat is then marinated in sauce for a MINIMUM of 4 hours in refrigerator. Refrigerate the meat (overnight is BEST), in a covered container.

Raw beef strips for beef jerky, marinating in bowl.

When the meat for the beef jerky is done marinating, lay the beef strips on paper towels to absorb excess sauce. Pat lightly dry.

Marinated beef jerky strips draining on paper towel.

Dehydrating The Beef Jerky

Place strips of beef onto dehydrator racks leaving space for air to flow between each piece. If you are using an oven, place the strips onto aluminum foil covered baking sheets.

Strips of marinated beef in dehydrator

If you are using a food dehydrator, dry the beef jerky strips for between 3-4 hours, turning strips over about halfway through drying process. When done the beef jerky should be fully dry, but still pliable.

If Using An Oven To Make Beef Jerky

If using oven, dry the jerky on the lowest setting your oven will go (usually between 150 and 170 degrees). The beef jerky will need to dry in oven for 8-10 hours, so it’s easy to put it in oven at night and have it done the next morning.

Storing Beef Jerky

The finished beef jerky will have a very nice smoky, slightly teriyaki taste, and boy, is it GOOD! Remove the strips from the dehydrator or oven, and let them completely cool.  Keep any leftover beef jerky stored in an airtight container or sealable bag.

I’ve made my own beef jerky for over 20 years now, and it is always a big hit with my husband and our sons… and given the price of a bag of jerky at the store (whoa!), making it at home is a real money saver!

Pieces of beef jerky on paper towel

Hope you will consider trying this easy recipe for beef jerky… it’s never failed me yet!  Have a fantastic day! Please come back again soon, for more yummy recipes.

Looking For More SNACK Recipes?

You can find all of my recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. I have quite a few recipes for some yummy snacks, including:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

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Recipe Source: My Mr. Coffee Food Dehydrator Owner’s Manual (really, really old)

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Beef Jerky DIY!
Prep Time
4 hrs
Cook Time
4 hrs
Total Time
8 hrs
 

Make your own delicious beef jerky in a food dehydrator or oven at home, for a fraction of the cost of purchasing it!

Category: Appetizer/Snack
Cuisine: American
Keyword: beef jerky
Servings: 25 slices (approx.)
Calories Per Serving: 35 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
For marinade:
  • 3/4 cup soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/4 cup Liquid Smoke
For meat:
  • 1 pound London Broil or flank steak
Instructions
  1. Slice meat into 1/8 inch wide strips (TIP: meat will cut BEST if you use slightly thawed, but still partially frozen meat).
  2. Combine marinade ingredients in medium sized bowl. Add meat strips to marinade. Coat all meat with marinade. Cover bowl and let marinate in refrigerator at LEAST 4 hours (or overnight-BEST!).

  3. When ready, lightly pat dry meat strips (place strips on paper towels). Lay strips on food dehydrator racks OR place strips on baking sheets lined with aluminum foil. Leave space between each piece so air can circulate.

  4. If using dehydrator, dehydrate at 145 degrees for approximately 3-4 hours, until dry but pliable. If using oven, turn oven to lowest setting (150-170 degrees). Let jerky bake for 8-10 hours until dry, but pliable.

  5. Remove beef jerky when done. Let cool completely. Store in airtight container. Enjoy!
Recipe Notes

Try to use meat with a limited amount of fat present, for best results. *The amount of marinade used will vary depending on how much meat you are using to make jerky. You will need to have enough of the sauce to marinade all strips of beef. 

Nutrition Facts
Beef Jerky DIY!
Amount Per Serving (1 piece)
Calories 35
% Daily Value*
Cholesterol 11mg4%
Sodium 406mg18%
Potassium 85mg2%
Carbohydrates 2g1%
Sugar 2g2%
Protein 4g8%
Calcium 7mg1%
Iron 0.5mg3%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Make your own delicious beef jerky in a food dehydrator or oven at home, for a fraction of the cost of purchasing it!

 

 

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Bing Cherry Jam

Bing Cherry Jam, enhanced with the addition of amaretto, is a delicious fruit spread for toast or biscuits! The recipe includes canning instructions, for long term storage.Bing Cherry Jam, enhanced with the addition of amaretto, is a delicious fruit spread for toast or biscuits! Recipe includes canning instructions.

Each year I enjoy making many varieties of jam to store in our pantry, and to give away to family and friends. I’ve been canning jam for many years now.  Last summer I made Bing Cherry Jam for the first time, and was surprised at how delicious and flavorful it was!

Scroll Down For A Printable Recipe Card At The Bottom Of The Page

The History Of The “Bing Cherry”

The “Bing” Cherry is a firm, dark cherry, very common in the Pacific Northwest. It is believed to have first been cultivated in Oregon in 1875 by a horticulturist named Seth Lewelling. He was helped by his orchard foreman, a Chinese immigrant by the name of Ah Bing. Cherries are also acknowledged to have high antioxidant levels, as well.

I searched for a good “canning” recipe for this fruit after being given quite a large amount of these cherries by a good friend, who just so happens has a huge cherry tree at her home.

The recipe I used for this bing cherry jam is from one of my Ball Blue Books (Guide To Preserving). The jam is canned for long term storage by using a water bath canner. The idea of making Bing cherry jam intrigued me, and it was fun being able to use my Homemade Amaretto in it, as one of the ingredients.

Jars of bing cherry jam being processed in water bath canner

The flavor of ripe cherries, paired with cinnamon, cloves, and almond liqueur make this quite a tasty jam!

How Much Bing Cherry Jam Will This Recipe Yield?

This recipe for bing cherry jam makes about 6 half-pint jars.  This means there’s enough jam to save, and extra jars to bless others with!

Finished jars of bing cherry jam on dish towel.

Here is a picture of this delicious bing cherry jam, spread on a toasted English muffin…it’s so good!

Bing Cherry Jam / The Grateful Girl Cooks!

If you enjoy making homemade jam, I heartily recommend this recipe, as well as other jam recipes from my blog! They include such flavors as Blueberry, Strawberry, Raspberry, Rhubarb Orange, and Orange Marmalade.

If you enjoy making jam, be sure and check out ALL my jam recipes! They can be found in the Recipe Index at the top of the page. But whatever you do, definitely try this bing cherry jam recipe – it really has great flavor! Have a GREAT day!

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:

Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
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The Grateful Girl Cooks!
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Have a wonderful day!

Author's signature

Recipe Source:  “Ball Blue Book Guide To Preserving”, published 2014 by Hearthmark LLC dba Jarden Home Brands, page 49.

3 from 1 vote
Bing Cherry Jam
Prep Time
25 mins
Cook Time
10 mins
Total Time
35 mins
 

Bing Cherry Jam, enhanced with the addition of amaretto, is a delicious fruit spread for toast or biscuits!

Category: Breakfast, Jam
Cuisine: American
Keyword: cherry jam
Servings: 6 half-pint jars or 3 pint jars
Calories Per Serving: 47 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 1 quart (about 2 pounds) Bing cherries, pitted and stemmed
  • 6 Tablespoons Ball Classic Pectin (powder)
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon cloves
  • 1/4 cup lemon juice
  • 1/4 cup almond liqueur (I used Amaretto)
  • 4 ½ cups granulated sugar
Instructions
  1. While preparing the jam, also make sure you prepare water canner and hot canning jars/lids, per manufacturer instructions and USDA canning guidelines.
To Make Jam:
  1. Wash, drain, pit and de-stem cherries. Chop cherries into small pieces (make sure chopped cherries measure out to one quart, which is the equivalent of 4 cups).
  2. In a large saucepan, mix together the chopped cherries, pectin, cinnamon cloves, lemon juice and almond liqueur until well combined. Cook slowly on medium-high heat until mixture comes to a boil.
  3. Add the sugar all at once, stirring until all the sugar has dissolved. Bring this mixture to a FULL ROLLING BOIL (this means the boiling doesn't stop, even if you keep stirring it!). Let the jam boil fully for ONE MINUTE, continuing to stir the entire time. Remove the pan from the heat. If any foam has accumulated on top, skim it off with a spoon and discard.
To Fill Hot Canning Jars:
  1. Ladle hot jam into hot jars. Leave ¼ inch headspace in each jar. Remove any air bubbles from filled jar, by inserting plastic utensil into jar between jam and jar to release air that is trapped. Wipe the jar rim very good to ensure no sticky residue is present. Place lid and screw band onto jar. Tighten to fingertip tight only. Using canning tongs, carefully place each jar onto an elevated rack in simmering water (180 degrees) in water bath canner. Repeat the process until all your jars are filled and in canner.
To Process The Jam:
  1. Lower the filled rack into the simmering water. Make sure that the jars are completely covered with water (water must be an inch over the top of jar). Turn the heat to medium-high. Put a lid on the canner, and bring the water inside to a full, rolling boil. Once the water reaches a rolling boil, process the half-pint jars for 10 minutes. When 10 minutes is up, turn the heat off and take the lid off the pan. Let the jars sit in the hot water for 5 minutes, then carefully remove jars to a dish towel on the counter (Do not place hot jars directly on counter-they might crack, due to temperature variations). Let jars cool, upright, for 12 hours, without moving. Once cool, check to ensure a proper seal has been achieved, then label jars and store in pantry.
Nutrition Facts
Bing Cherry Jam
Amount Per Serving (1 Tablespoon)
Calories 47
% Daily Value*
Sodium 2mg0%
Potassium 22mg1%
Carbohydrates 12g4%
Sugar 10g11%
Vitamin A 5IU0%
Vitamin C 0.9mg1%
Calcium 1mg0%
Iron 0.1mg1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Bing Cherry Jam, enhanced with the addition of amaretto, is a delicious fruit spread for toast or biscuits! Recipe includes canning instructions.

 

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Italian-Style Tomato Sauce (and how to can it!)

Homemade Italian-style tomato sauce is used in lots of food (pizza, spaghetti, etc.). Learn how to make this classic sauce, and can it for long term storage!Homemade Italian-style tomato sauce is used in lots of food (pizza, spaghetti, etc.). Learn how to make this classic sauce, and can it for long term storage!
Last summer I canned lots of food to store in our pantry, including green beans, ranch-style beans, and this wonderful tasting Italian-Style Tomato Sauce. I was fortunate to be able to use a lot of Roma tomatoes from our backyard garden!

Scroll Down For A Printable Recipe Card At The bottom Of The Page

Some of the tomatoes we grew in our garden, used to make Italian-style tomato sauce.

This Italian-Style Tomato Sauce Is Canned Using a Water Bath Method!

The sauce was fairly easy to can, using a water bath canner.  I thought this sauce would have to be pressure canned, but I was wrong. I used my trusty Ball Canning cookbook for this recipe, and the rest is history! Perfect Italian-style tomato sauce!

The recipe from my “Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving” was tested scientifically so that this Italian-style tomato sauce can be safely processed in a water bath (as opposed to a pressure canner).   As long as you don’t alter the ingredients or quantities of ingredients used (because that might end up with an unsafe product), it is safe to water bath process this Italian-style tomato sauce.

Jars are processed in a water bath canner for 35 minutes

It’s been great to have extra jars of this delicious Italian-style tomato sauce in my pantry for last minute pasta sauces, soup recipes, etc. I’ve used them a lot recently!

Tip For Using The Sauce After Storage

When using the sauce from the pantry to use in your favorite recipes, add a bit of olive oil to the sauce to give it additional flavor. Olive oil is a great addition, because no olive oil is added to the sauce before canning (because it could go rancid during long term storage).

Jars of homemade Italian tomato sauce are canned and ready for pantry!

Lots Of Flavor

The finished sauce has a nice Italian flavor, due to the flavorful Roma tomatoes, minced garlic, onion, celery, carrot, and hot pepper flakes. Italian-style tomato sauce can be used in a variety of recipes. I’ve used it to make spaghetti sauce, some homemade pizza sauce, and have added it to soup, all with great results!

How Many Jars Will the Recipe Yield?

The recipe (as written below) will yield 3 pint sized jars. I easily doubled the recipe using exact measurements and ended up with 7 pints of sauce (as seen below). I am thrilled to have a few extra jars of this delicious Italian-style tomato sauce in our pantry to use in a variety of recipes!

It’s so convenient to know this Italian-style Tomato Sauce is in our pantry, which saves me a trip to the grocery store!

Homemade jars of Italian-style tomato sauce ready to go into pantry.

Have a fantastic day.. I hope you will consider making this recipe of Italian-style tomato sauce, if you enjoy canning as much as I do! Follow the recipe directions exactly. Prepare your jars and canner according to manufacturer’s instructions, and USDA canning guidelines.

Looking For More CANNING Recipes?

You can find ALL my recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. I have some wonderful canning recipes (for pressure canning OR water bath canning), including:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:

Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest:
The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram:
jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Author's signature

Recipe Source: “Ball Complete Book of Home Preserving”, page 365, Jarden Corporation, copyright 2006 and 2012. Published by Robert Rose, Inc.

0 from 0 votes
Italian-Style Tomato Sauce (and how to can it!)
Prep Time
25 mins
Cook Time
35 mins
Total Time
1 hr
 
Homemade Italian-style tomato sauce is used in lots of food (pizza, spaghetti, etc.). Learn how to make this classic sauce, and can it for long term storage!
Category: Sauce
Cuisine: Italian
Keyword: Italian style tomato sauce
Servings: 12 3 pints
Calories Per Serving: 39 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 8 cups fresh plum (Roma) tomato purée (approx. 4.5 pounds) (see Notes section)
  • 2/3 cup finely chopped onion
  • 2/3 cup finely chopped celery
  • 1/2 cup finely chopped carrot
  • 2 cloves garlic , finely minced
  • 4 Tablespoons BOTTLED lemon juice
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
  • 1/2 teaspoon dried red chili pepper flakes
Instructions
  1. Prepare your water bath canner, jars and canning lids per manufacturer and USDA canning guidelines.

  2. In a big stainless steel saucepan, combine the onion, celery, carrot and garlic with ONE CUP of the tomato purée. Cook on medium-high heat (stirring frequently) until it comes to a boil. Reduce heat, cover the saucepan, and cook this mixture for about 5 minutes (boiling gently). The vegetables should be tender at the end of this cooking time. While the liquid is still boiling steadily, add the rest of the tomato purée to the pan (one cup at a time), stirring well.
  3. Add the bottled lemon juice, salt, black pepper and the dried red chili pepper flakes.
  4. Turn the heat up to High. Bring the sauce to a rolling boil. Continue to boil the sauce hard, making sure you stir the sauce quite frequently. Continue boiling sauce until the mixture has been reduced by one-third (this will take about 15 minutes or so to reduce).
  5. Ladle the tomato sauce (very hot) into the hot canning jars. Leave 1/2 inch headspace. Remove the air bubbles, and adjust the headspace in jars, if needed, by adding more sauce. Clean off the rim. Place the lid on the jar, and add the screw band; tighten screw band until fingertip tight.
  6. Carefully place jars into simmering water in the canner. Make sure that hot water completely covers the jars and goes about an inch OVER the lids. Place lid on canner. Bring water to a full boil, then process jars for 35 minutes. When time is up, turn off heat and remove the lid from the canner. Wait for 5 minutes, then carefully remove hot jars of sauce (without tilting jars) to a dish towel on the countertop (do NOT place jars directly on countertop or they might crack). Let jars cool completely (24 hours), without disturbing them. Water on jar lids will evaporate naturally. After a few minutes, you should hear them make a "pinging" sound, indicating they have sealed properly. After jars have cooled for 24 hours and before storing in pantry, check to ensure lids have properly sealed, per USDA canning guidelines.
Recipe Notes

To puree tomatoes: Blanch, peel, core, and seed tomatoes. Put them into a colander and let them sit for 15 minutes. Discard the liquid. Put the tomatoes into a food processor. Purée with metal blade.

Nutrition Facts
Italian-Style Tomato Sauce (and how to can it!)
Amount Per Serving (0.5 cup)
Calories 39
% Daily Value*
Sodium 404mg18%
Potassium 456mg13%
Carbohydrates 8g3%
Fiber 2g8%
Sugar 5g6%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 2390IU48%
Vitamin C 26.6mg32%
Calcium 24mg2%
Iron 0.5mg3%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Homemade Italian-style tomato sauce is used in lots of food (pizza, spaghetti, etc.). Learn how to make this classic sauce, and can it for long term storage!

 

 

 

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Rhubarb-Orange Jam

Sweet and just a little tart, this Rhubarb-Orange Jam is a perfect combo to enjoy on toast or muffins! Canning instructions for long term storage are included with recipe.Sweet and just a little tart, this Rhubarb-Orange Jam is a perfect combo to enjoy on toast or muffins! Canning instructions included with recipe.

Last year I ordered the newest edition of “The Ball Blue Book – Guide To Preserving”, and had fun looking at recipes and getting ideas for jams.

The first recipe I used from the book was for Rhubarb-Orange Jam, and boy, was I was surprised at just how GOOD it tastes!

Scroll Down For A Printable Recipe Card At The Bottom Of The Page

How Much Jam Will this Recipe Yield?

This recipe will yield enough jam for about 7 half-pint jars, so I have plenty for our pantry and a few to give to friends!  Talk about simple – this recipe only has 4 ingredients… rhubarb, oranges, sugar, and pectin. If you’ve made jam and canned it before, it is pretty “textbook” jam making.

This rhubarb-orange jam is really delicious! A cool thing for me was being able to use rhubarb grown in our own backyard garden to make this jam!

Rhubarb growing in garden, used for making rhubarb-orange jam.

Can I Make Rhubarb-Orange Jam If I Will NOT Be Canning IT?

The answer is YES. However, if storing in the refrigerator, the jam will have a much shorter “life” than processed and canned jam.

If you are NOT going to be canning the jam, make sure to store the jam in a sealed container(s) in the refrigerator. The recipe makes approximately 7 half pint jars of jam, so you will have a LOT of jam to eat! That’s about 112 TABLESPOONS of rhubarb-orange jam!

You can also put this delicious jam (not processed for long term storage) in half-pint jars and give to friends or family, with instructions directing them to keep in the fridge, and use soon. The “unprocessed or un-canned” jars will NOT be shelf stable for long term storage.

If You Are Going To Can The Rhubarb-Orange Jam

I recommend following all basic USDA guidelines for canning, as a matter of precaution. This includes sterilizing the jars and flat lids that you will be using.

The rhubarb used to make rhubarb-orange jam is sliced before cooking.

Processing Jars Of Rhubarb-Orange Jam

This jam is easily made in a water bath canner. After pre-cooking the rhubarb, oranges, sugar and pectin, the rhubarb-orange jam is carefully ladled into hot, sterilized half-pint canning jars.

The jars are filled, wiped clean, and secured with a flat lid and screw band.  Filled jars of rhubarb-orange jam are then placed on an elevated rack and covered with simmering water in the canner.

Jars of rhubarb-orange jam are processed for ten minutes in a water bath canner.

This jam is processed for 10 minutes in the water bath canner.  When done, the hot jars are carefully removed, and they are left undisturbed, overnight, to cool completely.

Once cooled, the jars of rhubarb-orange jam are then wiped clean of any sticky residue from the canning process.

The only thing left to do is label the jars, and place them in the pantry, for long term storage.

Jars of rhubarb-orange jam cooling on a dish towel, after processing.

Rhubarb and orange flavors present in this jam are very delightful! A little burst of citrus from the orange zest and juice nicely compliments the slightly tart flavor of the rhubarb.

The rhubarb-orange jam will provide a delicious topping for your toast and muffins, etc. If you have canned it for long term storage, you can pull a shelf-stable jar of this yummy jam out of the pantry any time you want!

I hope you consider trying this recipe for rhubarb-orange jam… and trust you will enjoy it!  Have a fantastic day, and please come back again soon.

Looking For More JAM Recipes?

You can find all of my jam recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page.  A few family favorites include:

Want More Recipes? Get My FREE Newsletter!

I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with lots of recipes, tips, etc..
Would you like to join our growing list of subscribers?

There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use.
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Recipe Source: “Ball Blue Book – Guide To Preserving”, copyright 2014, Hearthmark, LLC (dba Jarden Home Brands), page 54.

↓↓ PRINTABLE RECIPE BELOW ↓↓

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Rhubarb-Orange Jam
Prep Time
25 mins
Cook Time
10 mins
Total Time
35 mins
 
Sweet and just a little tart, this Rhubarb-Orange Jam is a perfect combo to enjoy on toast or muffins!
Category: Jam / Canning and Preserving
Cuisine: American
Keyword: rhubarb-orange jam
Servings: 112 Tablespoons (approx. 7 half-pint jars)
Calories Per Serving: 47 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 2 1/2 pounds fresh rhubarb (between 10 and 18 stalks, depending on size)
  • 2-3 medium navel oranges
  • 6 Tablespoons Ball Classic Powdered Pectin
  • 6 cups granulated sugar
Instructions
Prep The Fruit:
  1. Prep the rhubarb and oranges. Wash and drain rhubarb, then cut off the leafy tops and the root ends from the rhubarb stalks. Discard. Slice rhubarb into 1/2 inch chunks. Rinse oranges. Cut them in half and take out the seeds. Juice the oranges (you will need 1 cup of fresh squeezed orange juice) Remove the peel from one of the orange halves. Remove the white part (pith) from the peel. Slice the peel into very thin little pieces.
Cook The Jam:
  1. Place the chopped rhubarb, fresh squeezed orange juice and orange peel slivers in a large saucepan. Cover the pan, and cook on a low simmer for about 3 minutes (the rhubarb should be tender when done). Stir in 6 Tablespoons of pectin powder, and stir until fully mixed. Turn the heat up to medium-high, and cook jam mixture until it comes to a boil. Once it reaches a full boil, add the sugar to the pan all at once, stirring well, until the sugar dissolves. Continue cooking the jam until the mixture reaches a FULL ROLLING BOIL (meaning it continues to boil even when stirring). Boil this for 1 minute. stirring constantly while boiling. After one minute, remove the pan from the heat. Use a spoon to skim off any foam that has appeared on top of the jam mixture (and discard).
Fill the Hot Canning Jars:
  1. Canning jars should be sterilized and preheated before filling. Ladle hot jam mixture into your prepared, hot canning jars. Leave 1/4 inch headspace for each jar. Remove any air bubbles by running a plastic utensil down through jam. Completely wipe the jar rim clean. Put the jar lid and ring on jar. Tighten lid to fingertip tight. Place jars on rack in hot water bath canner over simmering water (180 degree F). Repeat with remaining jars.
To Process Jam:
  1. Make sure jars are on rack in simmering water. Water should cover the top of the jars by an inch. (Add boiling water to pan if necessary to completely cover tops of jars). Turn the heat to medium-high. Put a lid on the canner and bring it to a rolling boil. Once boiling, process jars (1/2 pint) for 10 minutes. Turn the heat off and take the lid off the pan. Let the jars sit in pan for 5 minutes to slightly cool. Remove jars from canner (don't try to re-tighten the lids if they have loosened up). Let the jars cool on a dish towel on the counter for 12 hours (don't put hot jars right onto countertop). You should hear each jar "ping" as it seals. Check jars for secure seal after they have cooled for 12 hours. Label jars and store.
Nutrition Facts
Rhubarb-Orange Jam
Amount Per Serving (1 Tablespoon)
Calories 47
% Daily Value*
Sodium 2mg0%
Potassium 33mg1%
Carbohydrates 12g4%
Sugar 11g12%
Vitamin A 15IU0%
Vitamin C 2.1mg3%
Calcium 10mg1%
Iron 0.1mg1%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Sweet and just a little tart, this Rhubarb-Orange Jam is a perfect combo to enjoy on toast or muffins! Canning instructions included with recipe.

 

 

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Apple Butter – and how to can it!

Smooth creamy apple butter is a delicious topping for toast, pound cake, or can be a sauce for roast pork. Learn how to can it with step by step instructions.Smooth creamy apple butter is a delicious topping for toast, pound cake, or can be a sauce for roast pork. Learn how to can it with step by step instructions.
Apples and Fall go together… like rain galoshes and buckets of rain, here in the Pacific Northwest! If you’ve never tried Apple Butter before, you’re missing out! Smearing a spoonful of it on a piece of toast is cinnamon-apple goodness, folks!

I’ve read that a lot of people use apple butter (think “jam”) as an accompaniment to roasted pork or other meat dishes, but I prefer it in it’s purest form… spread on a great piece of toast.  Apple Butter tastes like FALL, to me, with apples, sugar, cinnamon and cloves blended into this wonderful spread!

This recipe yields 8 half-pint (8 oz.) or 4 pint sized (12 oz.) jars of Apple Butter.  I canned 4 pint jars and gave a couple of the jars away to friends to enjoy, but that’s another story. If not canning for long term storage, make sure jars are refrigerated and apple butter used within a couple weeks.

Scroll Down For A Printable Recipe Card At The Bottom Of The Page

How To Make Apple Butter

In a mixing bowl, whisk together granulated sugar, cinnamon and ground cloves; set aside. (If you are using really sweet apples, decrease sugar amount to 5 cups).

Sugar and spices in metal mixing bowl

Place peeled, cored and quartered apples in a large stainless steel saucepan, along with water. You can use a variety of apples including Gala, Gravenstein, Golden Delicious, McIntosh, Braeburn, etc. You can also mix varieties to suit your taste.

These softer, sweet apples seem to work the best for making this apple butter, as opposed to using tart firm apples, such as Granny Smith.

Apples and water in red saucepan

Bring this mixture to a full boil on medium-high heat. Reduce the heat to low and continue to gently boil the apples and water for about 30 minutes. Stir occasionally. Apples should be softened.

Chopped apple chunks softening in red saucepan

Using an immersion blender (or a canister blender or food processor), puree the hot apple mixture until you have a consistent, smooth texture, but do not liquefy.

Immersion blender in pan of apples to blend

Measure out apple puree (see recipe below) and pour it into a large, clean stainless steel saucepan. Add the sugar/cinnamon/clove mixture; stir to combine.

Adding sugar and spices to apple puree in pan

Bring the puree to a boil (medium-high), and stir frequently while it cooks. Once it reaches a boil, reduce heat again to low and boil gently until the puree has thickened and can hold it’s shape on a spoon.

Red saucepan of apple butter cooking

Here’s an easy way to test and see if it is done. Take a small spoonful and put it onto a CHILLED plate. If the liquid does NOT separate (making a watery rim around the edge), and the puree maintains a spreadable shape, then the apple butter is ready.

Ladle with hot apple butter dripping

If you are NOT canning the apple butter, ladle the hot butter into clean mason jars, wipe lids clean, secure lids on jars, and refrigerate (and/or give away). Apple Butter that is not canned must be kept refrigerated, and has a limited storage time.

Canning Apple Butter

If you ARE canning for long term storage, prepare jars, canner, and jar lids while making the apple butter, according to canner manufacturer and USDA canning guidelines.

Ladle the hot apple butter into hot canning jars. Leave 1/4 inch head space. Remove air bubbles by inserting plastic knife or plastic canning tool into butter several times. Adjust the head space, if necessary, to maintain 1/4 inch head space. Wipe the rims of the jars clean, then put flat lid on, followed by screw lid. Tighten it just to fingertip tight.

Sealed jars of apple butter going into canner

Process apple butter on rack in prepared canner, and process according to directions (see recipe below).

Jars of apple butter sitting in water in canner

When done, remove canner lid, wait 5 minutes, then carefully remove jars from canner; let jars cool on kitchen towel on counter (not directly on counter-don’t want them to crack due to temperature extremes). Once you have made sure jars have sealed (with the famous “pinging sound”), let them cool for 24 hours, then store.

Time To Enjoy Some Apple Butter!

  Enjoy some of this tasty apple butter, spread on a good piece of toast! It also tastes wonderful as a topping for plain yogurt, or even added to vanilla ice cream!

Toast with apple butter spread on it

I hope you enjoy this delicious recipe. If you have a lot of pears you want to use up, be sure to check out my blog post for canning Pear Butter (no pectin). It’s delicious, too! .Have a great day. Be kind… encourage those who are experiencing pain or sorrow, and be a force for GOOD in this hurting world!

Looking For More CANNING Recipes?

You can find all of my canning recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. They include:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:
Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram: jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Author's signatureRecipe Source: Ball Complete Book Of Home Preserving, page 53, Published by Robert Rose, Inc., 2006.

5 from 1 vote
Apple Butter - and how to can it!
Prep Time
1 hr 5 mins
Cook Time
10 mins
Total Time
1 hr 15 mins
 

Smooth creamy apple butter is a delicious topping for toast, pound cake, or can be a sauce for roast pork. Learn how to can it with step by step instructions.

Category: Jam
Cuisine: American
Keyword: apple butter
Servings: 128 Tablespoons (4 pint jars)
Calories Per Serving: 47 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 6 lbs. apples (peeled, cored, and quartered)
  • 3 cups water
  • 6 cups sugar (if using sweet apples, decrease to 5 cups)
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons ground cinnamon
  • 1/2 teaspoon ground cloves
Instructions
  1. Combine the apples and water in a large saucepan. Bring this to a boil over medium-high heat. Once it reaches boiling, reduce the heat to low and boil mixture gently, for about 30 minutes, until the apples soften. Stir mixture occasionally.
  2. Puree the apple mixture using an immersion blender OR transfer the apple mixture to a food processor or blender. Process until smooth, but do not liquefy.
  3. Measure out 12 cups of apple puree into a clean large saucepan. Add sugar, cinnamon and cloves. Stir this mixture up until all the sugar has dissolved. Once dissolved, bring the mixture to a boil (again over medium-high heat). Once it reaches a boil, reduce heat to low and continue to cook. Stir this very frequently to prevent scorching. Continue cooking until the mixture thickens and can hold its shape on a spoon. To test to see if it is ready, spoon a spoonful of the apple mixture onto a CHILLED plate. If the liquid does not separate and form a rim around the edge of the apple butter, and the mixture can hold a spreadable shape, the apple butter is ready to place into canning jars.
  4. While the apple butter is cooking, prepare your canner, jars, and lids, according to manufacturer and USDA canning guidelines.
  5. Once apple butter is done, ladle the hot apple butter into your hot canning jars. Leave 1/4 inch headspace. Make sure to remove air bubbles, then re-adjust the headspace, if needed. Wipe rim well, to ensure it is clean. Place the flat lid on jar, then screw on the band until it is fingertip tight.
  6. Place jars onto rack in prepared canner. Make sure they are completely covered with water (water should be at least an inch over the top of jars). Place lid on canner. Bring water to a full rolling boil, then process jars for 10 minutes. Take off the canner lid; let jars sit in water for 5 more minutes, then remove jars to a dish towel on kitchen counter (do not place hot jars directly on kitchen counter as they could crack due to temperature variations). Let jars sit on counter undisturbed for 24 hours. After testing each jar to make sure they have sealed properly, the jars are safe to store in pantry.
Nutrition Facts
Apple Butter - and how to can it!
Amount Per Serving (1 Tablespoon)
Calories 47 Calories from Fat 9
% Daily Value*
Fat 1g2%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 1mg0%
Potassium 23mg1%
Carbohydrates 12g4%
Fiber 1g4%
Sugar 12g13%
Protein 1g2%
Vitamin A 11IU0%
Vitamin C 1mg1%
Calcium 2mg0%
Iron 1mg6%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Smooth creamy apple butter is a delicious topping for toast, pound cake, or can be a sauce for roast pork. Learn how to can it with step by step instructions.

 

 

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Cilantro-Lime Enchilada Sauce

This delicious homemade cilantro lime enchilada sauce can be used for enchiladas, tacos, quesadillas, etc. Canning instructions are included.This delicious green enchilada sauce features the Southwest flavors of tomatillos, cilantro, and lime, and can be used for enchiladas, tacos, quesadillas, etc.

After a 5 day visit to Southern California to see my family, I’m glad to be back home in the great Pacific Northwest. Today I want to share the recipe for a fantastic tasting Cilantro-Lime Enchilada Sauce that I made (and canned) back in July.

I’ve included instructions for canning this (optional), but you don’t have to do that to enjoy this delicious sauce on some enchiladas, or even to use as a taco sauce. It’s really good, very easy to prepare, and makes 3 pints of delicious enchilada sauce!

Scroll Down For A Printable Recipe Card At The Bottom Of The Page

This Recipe Uses Tomatillos – So What Is A Tomatillo?

I had never cooked with tomatillos before making this green sauce, but found them very easy to work with.  A tomatillo is also known as a Mexican Husk Tomato, due to the paper-like husk that surrounds it. This fruit/vegetable originated in Mexico, and is a key ingredient in Mexican and Central American green sauces.

Cilantro Lime Enchilada Sauce Is A Green Sauce!

When I make homemade enchiladas or order them at our favorite Mexican restaurant, I always go with a traditional red sauce, BUT I decided to branch out a bit and make this recipe for a green enchilada sauce.  The original recipe was from Pam at “Over The Big Moon.com”.

Do I Have To CAN This Cilantro Lime Enchilada Sauce?

No! Absolutely NOT! The recipe does NOT have to be canned, but I canned it (water-bath canning and recipe makes 3 pints), so I could have some in our pantry for “later”. Further down in this post, you can see how to store it, if not canning it!

I used the first batch of this sauce to make some Pork Enchiladas With Cilantro Lime Sauce, and whoa… they were amazingly DELICIOUS!

Chicken enchiladas with cilantro lime enchilada sauceThe sauce was very easy to prepare, and I absolutely will make it again, so I can have more in our pantry!  Here’s how I made it:

How To Make Cilantro Lime Enchilada Sauce

Rinse, peel and de-stem the tomatillos, then cut each tomatillo in quarters (6 cups total).

Tomatillos are used to make cilantro lime enchilada sauce.
Place the tomatillos into a large stockpot,, and add the chopped onion, minced garlic, and chopped jalapeno peppers.

Cooking tomatillos, onions, jalapenos for sauce
Drizzle everything in the pot with olive oil. Cook the tomatillos on medium-high heat for a few minutes. While the tomatillos and other veggies are cooking, chop up the fresh cilantro.

Chopped cilantro for adding to cilantro lime sauce
Cooking The Tomatillo Mixture

After the tomatillo mixture has cooked for a few minutes, add the water, chopped cilantro, cumin, and salt to the pan. Place a lid on the pot and turn the heat to low temperature. Cook on low for about 10-12 minutes.

Cilantro, water, and spices added to sauce in pan
Once the tomatillos are pretty soft, use an immersion blender to completely puree everything into a smooth sauce. NOTE: If you do not have an immersion blender (mine was a gift!), put everything into a blender or a food processor and blend until smooth (might have to do it in batches).

Once the cilantro lime enchilada sauce is smooth, add the lime juice to the mixture and mix well, to fully combine.

Using immersion blender to puree tomatillos in enchilada sauce
What If I Am NOT Going To CAN The Cilantro Lime Enchilada Sauce? At this point if you are NOT going to can it, you can use some right away, to make enchiladas!  Make sure to keep the leftover sauce covered and refrigerated.

Can I FREEZE The Sauce?

Yes, you can freeze the sauce. It will keep in the freezer for 2-3 months. You will need to store the sauce in air-tight containers or freezer bags in the freezer.

Cilantro lime enchilada sauce has been blended

How Do I CAN The Cilantro Lime Enchilada Sauce?

**If you are going to can the enchilada sauce, you will need to add the hot enchilada sauce into your clean, hot canning jars (that have been prepped according to USDA safe canning guidelines)YOU WILL ALSO NEED TO ADD ADDITIONAL LIME JUICE TO EACH JAR BEFORE PROCESSING (SEE RECIPE BELOW).

Fill the jars leaving 1/2 ” headspace, remove air bubbles, adjust headspace, if necessary. Wipe rims, then apply 2 piece canning lids that have been prepped according to safe canning guidelines.  Process in boiling water in water bath canner for 40 minutes, following published canning guidelines**.

Jars of cilantro lime sauce in water bath canner

Cilantro Lime Enchilada Sauce, canned and ready to use or store in pantry!
Hope you will give this recipe a try! The cilantro-lime enchilada sauce is delicious and fresh tasting! Update (2019): This recipe for cilantro lime enchilada sauce continues to be used, over and over. I’ve made this enchilada sauce at least 5 times now, and it is fantastic!

Thank you for stopping by today. I hope you will come back soon for more delicious recipes.

Looking For More CANNING Recipes?

You can find all my canning recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. These include:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe! 

There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:

Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest:
The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram:
jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Have a wonderful day!

Author's signatureRecipe Source: http://overthebigmoon.com/canning-cilantro-lime-enchilada-sauce/

0 from 0 votes
Cilantro-Lime Enchilada Sauce
Prep Time
10 mins
Cook Time
20 mins
Canning Time
40 mins
Total Time
30 mins
 
This delicious green enchilada sauce features the Southwest flavors of tomatillos, cilantro, and lime, and can be used for enchiladas, tacos, quesadillas, etc.
Category: Condiment
Cuisine: Mexican
Keyword: cilantro lime enchilada sauce
Servings: 3 pints
Calories Per Serving: 163 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 6 cups tomatillos , husks removed and quartered
  • 1/2 cup brown onion , chopped
  • 3 cloves garlic (sliced thinly, or use equivalent of minced garlic)
  • 2 medium jalapeno peppers , finely chopped
  • 3 Tablespoons cilantro , chopped
  • 1/2 teaspoon cumin
  • 1 1/2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 1/2 cups water
  • 1 Tablespoon olive oil
  • 1/4 cup fresh lime juice
  • 2 additional fresh limes (to use only if you are canning this recipe)
Instructions
  1. Remove husks from tomatillos; rinse tomatillos, then cut into quarters. Place into large saute pan or stockpot, along with the garlic and chopped jalapenos, then drizzle all with a bit of olive oil.
  2. Cook the veggies on medium high heat for 4-5 minutes. Add the water, cilantro, cumin and salt to the pan. Put a lid on the pan; continue to simmer the veggies on low for about 10 minutes or so, until the tomatillos have softened.

  3. Once tomatillos have softened, use an immersion blender to blend ingredients until you have a smooth sauce. May also put the hot ingredients into a blender or a food processor (in batches), and process until smooth.
  4. Once sauce is smooth, stir in 1/4 cup of fresh lime juice to combine. If you are NOT canning the sauce, it is now ready to use.
  5. IF YOU ARE GOING TO CAN THE SAUCE: Pour the hot enchilada sauce into clean, hot canning jars. Squeeze the juice from 1/2 a lime into each jar - DO NOT FORGET TO ADD THE EXTRA LIME JUICE TO JAR, SINCE THIS ADDS THE EXTRA ACIDITY NECESSARY FOR LONG TERM STORAGE. Leave 1/2" headspace in each jar. Remove air bubbles, wipe rim of jar with clean cloth, then attach prepared heated jar lid (again, per guidelines) and jar ring. Please follow USDA canning guidelines if you are not familiar with the canning process. Process in a water bath canner for 40 minutes. When done, remove jars to a kitchen towel (do not sit right on counter), and let jars completely cool. Once you have ensured they have sealed correctly, they may be stored in pantry.
Recipe Notes

**The cooking time listed is for making the sauce. If you will be canning the sauce, and additional 40 minutes of processing time will be necessary.

Nutrition Facts
Cilantro-Lime Enchilada Sauce
Amount Per Serving (1 Pint Jar)
Calories 163 Calories from Fat 63
% Daily Value*
Fat 7g11%
Saturated Fat 1g6%
Sodium 1169mg51%
Potassium 850mg24%
Carbohydrates 26g9%
Fiber 6g25%
Sugar 13g14%
Protein 3g6%
Vitamin A 450IU9%
Vitamin C 63.9mg77%
Calcium 45mg5%
Iron 2.1mg12%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!This delicious homemade cilantro lime enchilada sauce can be used for enchiladas, tacos, quesadillas, etc. Canning instructions are included.

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Raspberry Jam

Making homemade raspberry jam and canning jars of it for long term storage is a great way to enjoy the taste of summer raspberries all year round!Making homemade raspberry jam and canning jars of it for long term storage is a great way to enjoy the taste of fresh summer raspberries all year round!
It’s THAT time of year once again… I go and pick fresh berries at a local U-Pick Farm, then come home and “morph” the berries into several different recipes. This Raspberry Jam is the result of my latest berry picking adventure!

Scroll Down For A Printable Recipe Card At The Bottom Of The Page

I Love To Pick Raspberries At A Local Farm

There’s something to be said for picking your own raspberries in the cool of the morning on a gorgeous day. It’s also fun to use those fresh-picked berries to make raspberry jam! That’s my feeling every single time I pick berries at a local U-Pick place, called Rowell Brothers Berry Farm, which has been in existence since 1853.

Fresh raspberries, ready to pick!
This time I picked about 14 pounds of Willamette Red Raspberries. Here’s a few of them…

One of the buckets of fresh raspberries, freshly picked!
I use a lot of berries picked to make homemade raspberry jam. Jam making, once you get the “basics” down, is fairly easy and results in lots of jars of jam to store in our pantry.

Prepare Equipment and Jars For Canning

To make this recipe for raspberry jam, first wash and pre-heat the jars and lids (lids are in separate bowl). Follow all manufacturer guidelines for canning equipment.

Jars are preheated in a water bath canner, used to make jamPrepare The Raspberry Jam

Crush the raspberries (I used my trusty potato masher), measure the exact amount of raspberries into a large cooking pot, then add one box (2 ounces) of powdered fruit pectin, and stir it in.

Fruit pectin powder is added to crushed raspberries in large pot.
Bring the raspberry/pectin mixture to a full rolling boil (a “rolling boil” means it won’t stop boiling even while stirring), then add the sugar quickly, and stir it all to combine.

Granulated sugar is added to fruit in pan when making jam.
Bring the raspberry/pectin/sugar mixture to a full rolling boil, then continue boiling it for exactly 4 minutes, stirring constantly.

Raspberries, pectin and sugar are brought to a full rolling boil.
After it has boiled for 4 minutes, remove pan from heat, and skim off the foam that has accumulated on the top of the jam mixture.

Foam is skimmed off the cooked raspberry jam mixture in pot.Fill the Jars With Jam

Ladle the HOT raspberry jam into prepared canning jars, using a wide mouth canning funnel.

Hot raspberry jam is ladled into hot canning jars using a funnel
Add jam up to 1/8 inch headspace from the top of the jar, then follow standard canning instructions for removing the air bubbles from jam.

Headspace is measured in canning jar.
Adjust the headspace (if necessary), then wipe rim of the jar with a wet paper towel to remove any jam debris (so the jar would seal properly).

Rims of the jam jars are wiped clean so lids will seal.
Use magnetic canning wand (if you have one) to pick up the hot lids out of the water, and place one on each jar.

Canning wand with magnetic tip lifts lids to place on jars.
Screw the jar rings on, fingertip tight, then carefully lower jars into water bath canner, making sure that jars are completely covered by at least one inch of water above the tops of the jars.

Jars of raspberry jam sit in water on rack inside cannerProcess The Jars Of Raspberry Jam

Cover the canner, and bring water to a boil. Process the raspberry jam for 10 minutes (after it comes to a boil).

Canner is covered, then raspberry jam is processed for 10 minutes.
When processing time is done, turn off heat, wait for a couple minutes, remove lid, then remove jars of raspberry jam (using canning tongs), and set them on a dish towel to cool.

Raspberry jam in sealed jars cool to room temperature after processing.
Let the jars sit, undisturbed on the dish towel for 24 hours, listening for the tell-tale “PING” sounds, which means the jars have sealed. Check the seal by lightly pressing on the middle of the lid with a finger. If the jar did not seal, the lid will spring back. if that happens, you must refrigerate that jar of jam.

After 24 hours, I put all the jars of jam into our pantry, to use up throughout the year and to give as gifts. Just yesterday, I gave a jar to my next door neighbor That’s it… a little bit of time guarantees us absolutely delicious, fresh raspberry jam all year long! YAY!  Sure hope you’ll give this recipe a try!

Looking For More JAM Recipes?

You can find all of my jam recipes in the Recipe Index, located at the top of the page. I have several, including:

Interested In More Recipes?

Thank you for visiting this website. I appreciate you using some of your valuable time to do soIf you’re interested, I publish a newsletter 2 times per month (1st and 15th) with all the latest recipes, and other fun info. I would be honored to have you join our growing list of subscribers, so you never miss a great recipe!
There is a Newsletter subscription box on the top right side (or bottom) of each blog post, depending on the device you use, where you can easily submit your e-mail address (only) to be included in my mailing list.

You Can Also Find Me On Social Media:

Facebook page: The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Pinterest:
The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Instagram:
jbatthegratefulgirlcooks

Have a GREAT day!

Author's signatureRecipe Source: Instruction page for jam, found in box of MCP Premium Fruit Pectin.

0 from 0 votes
Raspberry Jam
Prep Time
30 mins
Cook Time
10 mins
Total Time
40 mins
 
Making homemade raspberry jam and canning jars of it for long term storage is a great way to enjoy the taste of fresh summer raspberries all year round!
Category: Jam
Cuisine: American
Keyword: raspberry jam
Servings: 10 cups (approx.10 half pint jars)
Calories Per Serving: 43 kcal
Author: JB @ The Grateful Girl Cooks!
Ingredients
  • 6 cups of crushed raspberries (measure AFTER crushing them)
  • 8 1/2 cups granulated sugar
  • 2 ounces Classic powdered fruit pectin (1 box)
Instructions
  1. Fill a boiling water canner half full of water. Bring this to a simmer. (At the same time, I start a teapot with water going, so I will have boiling water for the jar lids later on). Wash jars and lids in soapy hot water. Put lids in small bowl. Fill jars with water and put in canner on a rack, while it is simmering, to keep jars warm. (Or you can set jars on dish towel on a cookie sheet and keep in oven at 250 degrees for 20 minutes for same effect).

  2. In a large bowl, measure out the exact amount of sugar. Set aside.
  3. Crush the raspberries, one cup at a time, until you have 6 cups of mashed berries. Put the berries into a large stock pot. Stir the box of Pectin into the berries. Bring the raspberry mixture to a full rolling boil on high heat, stirring constantly (a rolling boil is when it is boiling hard, so that it won't stop bubbling even when stirred). Stir in all of the sugar quickly (all at once). Stir well to combine.

  4. At this point, I pour boiling water over the jar lids that are in the little bowl. Let them just sit in the hot water for 5 minutes while you finish the jam.
  5. Bring the jam/pectin/sugar mixture back to a full, rolling boil. Once it is a full rolling boil, boil it for exactly 4 minutes, stirring constantly. When time is up, remove pan from heat, then skim off any accumulated foam (and discard foam). Ladle the hot jam mixture into hot, prepared jars. Fill the jars, but leave 1/8 inch headspace at the top of each jar. Insert a plastic knife into each jar a couple times to help remove air bubbles. Adjust the headspace if necessary. Use a damp cloth or paper towel to wipe down the rim and edges of the jar. You need it free of debris in order to get a good seal on the jar. Cover the jars with the hot, flat jar lid. Screw on the jar rings tightly.

  6. Lower each of the jars onto an elevated rack in the canner. The jars must be completely covered with water, and must have at least an inch of water over the top of the jar. Add more boiling water to canner, if necessary, to make sure.
  7. Cover the canner; bring to a gentle boil. Once the water is boiling, process the jars for 10 minutes. When done, wait for a minute, carefully remove canner lid (lift lid away from you because of steam); carefully lift each jar out of water (with canning tongs), and place on dish towel on the counter to cool (do not put jars directly on counter cause you don't want temperature differences to possibly crack jars). You should hear "ping" sound as the jars seal properly.

  8. After the jars cool for 24 hours, you can check to see they sealed properly by pressing the middle of the lid. The jar should NOT spring back when touched. If it does spring back, then you will need to refrigerate that particular jar. Let the sealed jars stand at room temp for 24 hours, then store unopened in a cool, dark place for up to 1 year.

Recipe Notes

FYI-The ten cups of jam this recipe produced filled the equivalent of 10 half-pint jars.

Nutrition Facts
Raspberry Jam
Amount Per Serving (1 Tablespoon)
Calories 43
% Daily Value*
Potassium 6mg0%
Carbohydrates 11g4%
Sugar 10g11%
Vitamin C 1.2mg1%
Calcium 1mg0%
* Percent Daily Values are based on a 2000 calorie diet.

Here’s one more to pin on your Pinterest boards!Making homemade raspberry jam and canning jars of it for long term storage is a great way to enjoy the taste of fresh summer raspberries all year round!

 

 

 

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